BEST BETS | Mar. 21-Mar. 27, 2019

Atlanta-Ballet

WELCOME TO OUR weekly curated column. Feature photo: Juliana Missano of the Atlanta Ballet in the memorable green costumes designed for Sandpaper Ballet by Issac Mizrahi. Sandpaper Ballet in part of the Atlanta Ballet’s Look/Don’t Touch performance. Photo by Rachel Neville. 

This weekend only

Jersey Boys. Runs March 22 – 24. Broadway in Atlanta @ Fox Theatre.  Don’t miss the toe-tapping true story of how four blue-collar kids became The Four Seasons and one of the greatest successes in pop music history. This 2006 Tony Award-winning Best Musical takes you with Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons as they rise in the charts, travel across the country, and create timeless music.  This show is full of experience electrifying performances of the classic hits that earned The Four Seasons a place in the the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: ‘Sherry,’ ‘Big Girls Don’t Cry,’ ‘Can’t Take My Eyes Off You,’ ‘Dawn,’ ‘My Eyes Adored You,’ and more.  Info and tickets on the Fox Theatre website.

BEST BETS | July 12-18, 2018

The RMS Titanic

“The Color Purple” (Actor’s Express), “Titanic” (Serenbe Playhouse) and the final days of “Winnie-the-Pooh” (Alliance Theatre) top this week’s curated edition of BEST BETS. Learn why while you check out this week’s openings, closings and what’s just ahead. Pictured: The RMS Titanic at Serenbe Playhouse. Design and rendering by Adam Koch. Photo by BreeAnne Clowdus.

**  INDICATES AN ENCORE ATLANTA SPRING/SUMMER TOP PICK. 

Recommended

Kevin Harry as Mister. Photo: Casey Gardner

Kevin Harry as Mister. Photo: Casey Gardner

** The Color Purple. THROUGH JULY 29. At Actor’s Express.

Alice Walker’s landmark, Pulitzer Prize-winning novel became a musical at Atlanta’s Alliance Theatre in 2004, and on Broadway in 2005 and 2015. The Express telling hews most closely to the more intimate 2015/17 revival.

The story follows the hardscrabble journey of a rural Georgia woman named Celie, who fights adversity to find strength, love and the power of her own voice over a 40-year span. Atlanta-based actor/director/educator David Koté directs. Latrice Pace is Celie, Jasmyne Hinson is Shug Avery, Kevin Harry is Mister and Kayce Grogan-Wallace is Sophia.

$22-$44 and selling well. Don’t delay. 8 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. In the King Plow Arts Center, 887 W. Marietta St. in West Midtown. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.607.7469.

 

Dash Clowdus-Howe. Photo: BreeAnne Clowdus

Dash Clowdus-Howe. Photo: BreeAnne Clowdus

Titanic. THROUGH AUG. 12. 

The credo for major musicals at Serenbe Playhouse often seems to be “go big or go home.” Carousel and Miss Saigon come to mind. Both might be outdone, however, by artistic director Brian Clowdus’ ambitious plans for this Tony Award-winning Broadway musical about the 1912 maritime disaster that killed 1,503.

Clowdus’ staging features a cast of 40 (including regulars Niki BaduaBlake BurgessJessica De Maria, Chase Peacock and Robert Wayne) and a four-story Titanic replica that sinks nightly in Serenbe’s Inn Lake. But, as Clowdus says, “It’s not about the boat sinking. It’s about people on a voyage or quest for joy, hope and change.” All Serenbe shows take place outdoors and can require a walk along a muddy path.

Appropriate footwear recommended. For mobility assistance (parking, accessibility cart, etc.), contact the box office.

$35 and up. 8 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday. Serenbe is at 9110 Selborne Lane in Chattahoochee Hills. Details, tickets HERE or at 770.463.1110. Discount tickets at PoshDealz.com.

 

Joe Sykes (Eeyore), Mabel Tyler (Piglet). Photo: Greg Mooney

Joe Sykes (Eeyore), Mabel Tyler (Piglet). Photo: Greg Mooney

Winnie-the-Pooh. CLOSES SUNDAY.

It’s nearly time to bid the Hundred Acre Wood goodbye. The Alliance Theatre opens its 50th anniversary season with this fanciful family musical based on the A.A. Milne books. Spend a life-affirming hour with Pooh, Piglet, Rabbit, Eeyore, Kanga, Roo and Owl as one adventure (or misadventure) turns into another, friendship triumphs and a certain donkey’s birthday is celebrated.

The cast is led by Atlanta actors Isake Akanke(Synchronicity’s Eclipsed), Grant Chapman (Actor’s Express’ Angels in America), Maria Rodriguez-Sager (Theatrical Outfit’s Christmas at Pemberley) and Joe Sykes (Angels in America).

$15; $10 ages 6-17; $5 ages 3-5; age 2 and under free. 10 + 11:45 a.m. through Friday; 10:30 a.m., 1 p.m. + 3:30 p.m. Saturday; and 3 p.m. Sunday. Rich Theatre, Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 Peachtree St. NE. Details, tickets HERE. Note: The High Museum of Art exhibition, Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring a Classic, runs through Sept. 2. Museum details, tickets HERE. For either the musical or the exhibit, call 404.733.5000. Discount tickets for the musical at PoshDealz.com.

[FOR THE LOVE OF POOH + THE HUNDRED ACRE WOOD]

Opening this week

Photo: Dad’s Garage

Photo: Dad’s Garage

Black Nerd. OPENS FRIDAY. At Dad’s Garage Theatre Company.

What happens when a black kid prefers listening to Weird Al over Kendrick Lamar, attending Dragon Con over seeing Jay-Z, or watching Star Wars instead of Tyler Perry?

This dark comedy follows a young man as he navigates the expectations of his black family and white friends, where race and geekdom collide. The script is the first solo effort from Dad’s company member Jon Carr, who collaborated on the earlier Wrath of Con.

$15.50-$29.50. Through Aug. 4. Dad’s is at 569 Ezzard St. SE. Details, tickets HERE (you’ll save money if you buy online) or at 404.523.3141.

 

The Book of Mormon. OPENS TUESDAY. Those shiny-faced Mormon missionaries revisit Atlanta (and Uganda) for more equal-opportunity offensiveness and a surprising amount of heart. The Broadway company is in its seventh year; Atlanta sees the national touring company. The show, by Matt Stone and Trey Parker (“South Park”) and Robert Lopez (Avenue Q), won nine 2011 Tony awards, including best musical.$34-$139 plus fees. Fox Theatre, 660 Peachtree St. N.E. Details, tickets HERE, in person at the Fox ticket office or at 855.285.8499.

[WHY MORMON STILL WORKS, AFTER 6-PLUS YEARS ON BROADWAY AND TOUR]

 

dot

Dot. OPENS TUESDAY.  At True Colors Theatre Company.

This gentle comedy by Colman Domingo uses humor to look at issues surrounding aging parents and midlife crises. The setting is Christmastime in urban West Philly. The playwright, Variety.com says, “sees the absurdity and human comedy in a messy, volatile, all-too-real family dynamic.” Atlanta-born, New York-based stage/film actor Denise Burse is Dot.

Also in the cast: Gilbert Glenn BrownTinashe Kajese-BoldenRhyn McLemore Saver and Lee Osorio. True Colors co-founder and artistic director Kenny Leon directs. Contains adult language, situations.

$20-$35. Through Aug. 12. 8 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 2:30 + 8 p.m. Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. True Colors performs at the Southwest Arts Center, 915 New Hope Road SW. Details, tickets HERE or at 877.725.8849 (Ticket Alternative).

Amanda Cucher (from left), Shelli Delgado, Holly Stevenson, Maggie Birgel. Photo: Casey Gardner

Amanda Cucher (from left), Shelli Delgado, Holly Stevenson, Maggie Birgel. Photo: Casey Gardner

Enchanted April. OPENS FRIDAY. From the Weird Sisters Theatre Project.

In 1922, two London housewives find themselves in dreary marriages in a post-World War I society. They decide to rent an Italian villa for a ladies-only escape with two reluctant recruits. Things lost are soon found as the women clash, then begin to bond and bloom under the Mediterranean sun. Matthew Barber’s romantic comedy, based on the 1922 novel by Elizabeth von Armin, had a four-month summer run on Broadway in 2003. Kate Donadio MacQueen directs.

The cast: Maggie Birgel, Josh Brook, Amanda CucherShelli Delgado, Stephanie Earle, J.L. Reed, Topher Payne and Holly Stevenson.

$10 plus fees for July 12 preview; otherwise $15 plus fees. Through July 29. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 7 p.m. Sunday. Performed at Out of Box Theatre,  585 Cobb Parkway South in Marietta. Tickets HERE.

Still running

Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type. THROUGH JULY 29. At the Center for Puppetry Arts. Cows that type? Chickens on strike? Check out Farmer Brown’s topsy-turvy barnyard in this adaptation by the Center’s Jon Ludwig and Jason Hines. It’s based on the Caldecott Honor-winning children’s book published in 2000. The comedy uses marionette, rod and shadow puppets and is appropriate for age 4 and up. The cast/puppeteers: Dolph Amick, Brian Harrison, Mandy Mitchell, head puppeteer Amy Sweeney and Tim Sweeney. $19.50. 10 a.m. + noon Tuesday-Friday; 11 a.m. + 1 p.m. Saturday; 1 + 3 p.m. Sunday. 1404 Spring St. NW. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.873.3391.

Photo: Center for Puppetry Arts

Photo: Center for Puppetry Arts

A Midsummer Night’s Dream. THROUGH JULY 29. Shakespeare Tavern Playhouse. ‘Tis the Midsummer season. Shakespeare Kennesaw, new this summer, recently finished its run, and September brings an outdoor version from the Alliance Theatre. At the Tavern, Kenneth Wigley (Theseus, Oberon) and Dani Herd (Hippolyta, Titania) lead a large band of storytellers in a comic tale about two pairs of lovers (one requited, one not so much) and a ragtag bunch of thespians who stumble upon a chaotic fairy kingdom. J. Tony Brown directs. Pub menu and libations available. $21-$42. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 6:30 p.m. Sunday. 499 Peachtree St. NE (parking suggested in the Emory University Hospital Midtown deck across the street). Details, tickets HERE or at 404.874.5299, Ext. 0.

Alexandria Joy as Tinker Bell. Photo: BreeAnne Clowdus

Alexandria Joy as Tinker Bell. Photo: BreeAnne Clowdus

Peter Pan.THROUGH AUG. 26. Serenbe Playhouse calls this a “world premiere musical pirate adventure.”

If you’re so inclined, sail to the second star on the right and straight on till morning to revisit J.M. Barrie’s 1904 tale about Peter, Tinker Bell, the Lost Boys and Neverland. Complications arise when the Lost Boys get homesick and Captain Hook returns seeking revenge. The story is by Roger Q. Mason, the score by London-trained, New York regular Ella GraceMichael Alvarez, who works largely in Britain, directs. Serenbe, which does outdoor, site-specific shows, sets Peter Pan at its Mado Hideaway.

All shows take place in the woods and require a walk along a sometimes muddy path. Appropriate footwear recommended. For mobility assistance (parking, accessibility cart, etc.), contact the box office.

$13-$30. 11 a.m. Thursday-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Serenbe is at 9110 Selborne Lane in Chattahoochee Hills. Details, tickets HERE or at 770.463.1110. Discount tickets at PoshDealz.com.

Scott DePoy (from left), Chris Damiano, Christopher Kent, Mark W. Schroeder (at piano). Photo: Georgia Ensemble Theatre

Scott DePoy (from left), Chris Damiano, Christopher Kent, Mark W. Schroeder (at piano). Photo: Georgia Ensemble Theatre

Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash. OPENS THURSDAY. 

Georgia Ensemble Theatre reprises last season’s jukebox musical about the Man in Black. Ring of Firetells Cash’s story through his songs — from vintage country to rockabilly and ballads — including “Daddy Sang Bass,” “A Boy Named Sue,” “Folsom Prison Blues,” “Going to Memphis,” “Jackson,” “If I Were a Carpenter,” “I Walk the Line” and 32 more. The run continues GET’s partnership with the Chattahoochee Nature Center for a fourth consecutive summer and features the same cast as last season: Chris DamianoScott DePoy, Christopher Kent, Laura Lindahl and Mark W. Schroeder.

$16.50 general admission lawn seating; $36.50 reserved table seating under the pavilion; $365 for a 10-person table. Cash bar (no outside alcohol or glass allowed). Through July 28. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday (grounds open at 6:30 p.m.). 9135 Willeo Road, Roswell. Details, tickets HERE or at 770.641.1260.

Coming up

Rachel Van Buskirk, Christian Clark. Photo: Kyle Sager / TMBT

Rachel Van Buskirk, Christian Clark. Photo: Kyle Sager / TMBT

Terminus Modern Ballet Theatre. JULY 27-28.

Two pop-up performances at the High Museum of Art feature Heath Gill’s Confronting Genius, described as “a whimsical duet that looks at unshackling the artist that lives inside us all.” Dancers from the company’s Advanced Summer Intensive program also perform. Terminus, founded in fall 2017, is dedicated to expanding ballet’s boundaries through contemporary movement and nontraditional approaches. Gill, along with co-founders Christian Clark, Tara Lee, Rachel Van Buskirk and John Welker, were longtime Atlanta Ballet dancers.

Free for High Museum members; $14.50 non-members. Seating limited.

7:30 p.m. Friday; 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The High Museum is at the Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 Peachtree St. NE.

Details HERE. Tickets HERE or at 404.733.5000.

 

fashionado

BEST BETS | Feb. 28-March 7, 2018

OUR BEST OF THE BEST BETS:  “King Hedley II” (True Colors), “Perfect Arrangement” (Theatrical Outfit) and “Sheltered” (Alliance Theatre). Last chance for “Daughter of the Regiment” (Atlanta Opera) and “Ontario Was Here” (Aurora Theatre). Pictured: Neal A. Ghant as King in “King Hedley II.” Photo by Horne Bros. Photography.

OUR BEST OF THE BEST BETS: “King Hedley II” (True Colors), “Perfect Arrangement” (Theatrical Outfit) and “Sheltered” (Alliance Theatre). Last chance for “Daughter of the Regiment” (Atlanta Opera) and “Ontario Was Here” (Aurora Theatre). Pictured: Neal A. Ghant as King in “King Hedley II.” Photo by Horne Bros. Photography.

**  INDICATES AN ENCORE ATLANTA WINTER SEASON TOP PICK.

Recommended

true-KingHedley

** King Hedley II. THROUGH MARCH 11.

At True Colors Theatre CompanyAugust Wilson (1945-2005) is one of the great American playwrights of any century and a personal favorite. King Hedley is part of his 10-play Century, or Pittsburgh, Cycle, all reflecting the black experience in 20th-century America. King (Neal A. Ghant) is an ex-con peddling stolen refrigerators in the inner city in the 1980s.

His goal: Buy a new business and, thus, a new life. Surrounding him in his quest, for better or worse, are his wife, his best friend, his mother, his mother’s ex-lover and a neighbor named Stool Pigeon (Eddie Bradley Jr.), a mystical sort of truthsayer. Also in the cast: Tiffany Denise HobbsTonia Jackson, E. Roger Mitchell and Eugene H. Russell IV). Jamil Jude directs. Some consider King Hedley II a tragedy of Shakespearean proportions. It seemed so in a mesmerizing 2003/04 staging at the Alliance Theatre. For age 16 and up (language, content).

$20-$35. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 2:30 + 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Southwest Arts Center, 915 New Hope Road SW. Details HERE, tickets at Ticket Alternative HERE or at 877.725.8849.

Ann Marie Gideon (from left), Ann Wilson, Courtney Patterson. Photo: Chris Bartelski

Ann Marie Gideon (from left), Ann Wilson, Courtney Patterson. Photo: Chris Bartelski

** Perfect Arrangement. THROUGH MARCH 18.

At Theatrical Outfit. Bob loves Jim, and Norma loves Millie, but both couples are masquerading as heterosexual during the Lavender Scare of the 1950s (when sexual “deviants” were targeted for dismissal from federal employment). 

Topher Payne, well-known to metro audiences (Angry Fags, The Only Light in Reno, Let Nothing You Dismay, Swell Party), won the 2014 American Theatre Critics Association Osborn Prize for his script, called “a clever canapé of a comedy” by The New York Times. 

The cast: Ann Marie GideonClifton Guterman,  Joe KnezevichStacy MelichCourtney PattersonKevin Stillwell and Ann Wilson.  Adam Koplan of New York’s Flying Carpet Theatre Company directs. Mature themes and content. 

$20.50-$49. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 2:30 + 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Balzer Theater at Herren’s, 84 Luckie St. NW. Details, tickets HERE or at 678.528.1500. Discount tickets at PoshDealz.com.

Each child rescued received a U.S. immigration card at the American Embassy in Berlin. Photo: U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

Each child rescued received a U.S. immigration card at the American Embassy in Berlin. Photo:
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

Sheltered. THROUGH MARCH 25.

World premiere at the Alliance Theatre.

This drama, by New York-based playwright Alix Sobler, is the 2018 winner of the Alliance/Kendeda National Graduate Playwriting Competition. Her suspense story is based on true events and takes place in 1939, as World War II threatens Europe. Two ordinary Philadelphians make an extraordinary decision: to bring 50 Jewish children from Nazi-occupied territory to safety in America. 

Kimberly Senior, a freelance director in New York, leads a cast comprising Lauren BoydAmanda Drinkall, Park Krausen, Lee Osorio and John Skelley. For age 12 and up. The Alliance’s annual KENDEDA WEEK (schedule here), beginning March 7 and featuring staged readings of four runner-up plays, is a highlight of Atlanta’s theatrical season. The readings (not Sheltered) are free but reservations are necessary. Don’t miss out! 

$42; $10 teens. Through March 25. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday; 8 p.m. Friday and March 3; 2:30 + 8 p.m. Saturday (except March 3); 2:30 + 7:30 p.m. Sunday. Performed at Actor’s Express in the King Plow Arts Center, 887 West Marietta St. NW in West Midtown. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.733.5000.

[MEET THE PLAYWRIGHT, DIRECTOR BEHIND AWARD-WINNING ‘SHELTERED’]

Opening this week

Lane Carlock. Photo: Dan Carmody / Studio 7

Lane Carlock. Photo: Dan Carmody / Studio 7

A Comedy of Tenors. OPENS TONIGHT.

At Georgia Ensemble Theatre. Fans of playwright Ken Ludwig have waited 30 years for a companion piece to his uber-popular, Tony Award-winning farce Lend Me a Tenor. This go-round, the setting is 1930s Paris, a city awaiting the concert of the century from an Italian superstar. The complications include one hotel suite, four tenors, two wives, three girlfriends and a soccer stadium full of screaming fans. Shelly McCook directs.

Good cast: Lane CarlockCourtney Collins (Calendar Girls), Robert Egizio (Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks ), Brian Kurlander, John Markowski, Lindsay Ricketson (Pump Boys and Dinettes) and Haden Ryder.

$29 and up, based on demand. Through March 18. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday; 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Also at 4 p.m. March 10 + 17. 

Roswell Cultural Arts Center, 950 Forrest St., Roswell. Details, tickets HERE or at 770.641.1260. Discount tickets at PoshDealz.com.

Il-Etait-Une-Fois

Il Etait Une Fois (Once Upon a Time). OPENS TUESDAY.

A Théâtre du Rêve world premiere written and directed by Carolyn Cook. The piece is inspired by female writers living during the reign of Louis XIV and the stories they crafted in the salons of Paris. Their stories carried subtle but subversive political ideas about the suppression of women’s legal rights, centuries before the #MeToo movement.

The cast: Natalie Karp, Eliana Marianes and Jennifer Schottstaedt. In French, with English supertitles.

$25; $21 senior citizens; $18 students. Through March 25. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday.

7 Stages Backstage Theatre, 1105 Euclid Ave. NE. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.523.7647.

 

miss-nelson-is-missing

Miss Nelson Is Missing. OPENS SATURDAY. 

At Georgia Ensemble Theatre. Joan Cushing’s quirky family musical shows what happens when the good-natured Miss Nelson goes missing and her class — the most ill-behaved kids in school — get stuck with the worst substitute teacher of all time.

Based on the Henry G. Allard book first published in 1977. The cast: Erik Poger AbrahamsenShelli DelgadoRobert Lee Hindsman, Asia Howard, JD Myersand Angelica K. Spence. Erin Bushko directs.

$10. Also March 10 + 17. 11 a.m. 

Roswell Cultural Arts Center, 950 Forrest St., Roswell. Details, tickets HERE or at 770.641.1260. 

 

Jeffrey Watkins

Jeffrey Watkins

William Luce’s Barrymore. PREVIEWS SUNDAY + MARCH 8 | OPENS MARCH 9.

At the Shakespeare Tavern Playhouse. Catch up with the idolized stage and screen actor John Barrymore a few months before his 1942 death, as he rehearses a revival of his 1920 Broadway triumph, Richard III. He mostly reminisces about his life, his loves and his alcoholism.

The cast: Playhouse artistic director Jeffrey Watkins is Barrymore, with Nicholas Faircloth as Frank the Prompter. For mature audiences (profanity, sexual innuendo).

Through March 25. $15 previews. Regularly $22-$45. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Pub menu and full bar available.

499 Peachtree St. NE (parking suggested in the Emory University Hospital Midtown deck across the street). Details, tickets HERE or at 404.874.5299, Ext. 0.

This week only

Edo de Waart

Edo de Waart

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. THURSDAY + SATURDAY.

Grammy-winning violinist Augustin Hadelich and his 1723 Stradivarius join the ASO and conductor Edo de Waart for a program of Russian masterpieces — Rachmaninov’s Symphony No. 2 and Shostakovich’s Violin Concerto No. 1.

Hadelich was born in Italy, grew up in Germany and was educated at the Juilliard School. De Waart, a Dutch conductor, is conductor laureate of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, chief conductor of the Royal Flemish Philharmonic and an artistic partner with Minnesota’s St. Paul Chamber Orchestra.

$22-$97. 8 nightly. Symphony Hall, Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 Peachtree St. NE. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.733.5000.

mermaid-ballet-fancy-nancy

Fancy NancyFRIDAY-SUNDAY. 

Synchronicity Theatre reprises this family musical for one weekend before it goes on tour.

Nancy (Shelby Folks) and her best friend, Bree (Jimmica Collins), can’t wait to star as mermaids in their school ballet, but all does not go as planned, and Nancy must find a way to bring her sophisticated flair to the role of a … tree. Based on the Fancy Nancy books by Jane O’Connor. Stage adaptation by Susan Dilallo and Danny Abosch. Also in the cast: Maggie Birgel, Stephanie Earle, Jeremiah Davison and Julie Key.

$20 and up; $15 and up for students and senior citizens. Swanky Seat upgrades available. 7 p.m. Friday (PJs & Play — kids in pajamas get free milk and cookies); 1 + 4 p.m. Saturday; 2 + 5 p.m. Sunday.

One Peachtree Pointe, 1545 Peachtree St. NE. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.484.8636.

 

Ladysmith

Ladysmith Black Mambazo. SATURDAY ONLY.

At Georgia State’s Rialto Center for the Arts. The famously popular South African choral group — all male — sings in the vocal styles of its homeland.

The five-time Grammy-winning group was formed in 1960, became one of South Africa’s most prolific recording artists and exports, and found worldwide fame when working on Paul Simon’s 1986 Graceland album. 

Ladysmith is a Rialto Center favorite. $38.25-$56 (limited seating remains). 8 p.m. 80 Forsyth St. NW. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.413.9849.

Last chance

The Daughter of the Regiment. CLOSES SUNDAY.

At The Atlanta Opera. Singers call Donizetti’s screwball comedy a “high C’s adventure” because of the demands it makes on its tenors. What was the composer thinking when he concocted a story about a girl raised by Napoleon’s rowdy grenadiers? Probably romantic hijinks with a soupçon of conflict. Marie, that little girl (soprano Andriana Chuchman), has come of age and fallen in love with the handsome Tonio (tenor Santiago Ballerini). Key characters oppose their union, of course, but it all ends happily ever after. Sung in French with English supertitles.

$35-$131. 8 p.m. Friday; 3 p.m. Sunday. Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre, 800 Cobb Galleria Parkway. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.881.8885. Discount tickets at PoshDealz.com.

Grenadiers, anyone?

Grenadiers, anyone?

Adriana Trachsell, Caleb Baumann. Photo: Greg Mooney

Adriana Trachsell, Caleb Baumann. Photo: Greg Mooney

The Jungle Book. CLOSES SUNDAY.

Alliance Theatre at the Porter Sanford III Performing Arts Center. Mowgli, a boy abandoned in the jungle, must find his place in the community of animals with the help of Baloo the bear, Bagheera the black panther and Akela the old wolf. Shere Khan the tiger is one beast who thinks Mowgli should be on his way.

The cast: Ashley Anderson, Caleb Baumann, Markelle Gay, Jonathan Horne, J.L. Reed and Adriana Trachell. Based on the Rudyard Kipling stories. With a score and musical direction by S. Renee Clark. Rosemary Newcott directs.

$18-$32. 1 + 3:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. 3181 Rainbow Drive, Decatur. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.733.5000.

[MARKELLE GAY IS BEARLY FAMOUS BUT EXPECT TO HEAR FROM HIM]

ontario

Ontario Was Here. CLOSES SUNDAY.

At Aurora Theatre. Kansas-based playwright Darren Canady, the 2007 winner of the Alliance/Kendeda National Graduate Playwriting Competition, returns with this contemporary drama about two social workers (Brittany L. SmithSeun Soyemi) on the front lines of the Department of Children and Families. Tempers flash when the co-workers (and former lovers) clash over what’s best for a 9-year-old boy. Their decisions could mean life or death. 

Cynthia D. Barker, better known for her work onstage, directs. This show is part of Aurora’s Harvel Lab Series, done in its smaller black-box space.

$20-$30. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Free, covered, attached parking in city deck at 153 E. Crogan St. Details, tickets HERE or at 678.226.6222. Discount tickets at PoshDealz.com.

Photo: David Zeiger

Photo: David Zeiger

Rainforest Adventures. CLOSES SUNDAY.

Return to the Amazonian jungle via the Center for Puppetry Arts, where Brazilian music accompanies a communion with 30-plus exotic plants and animals, including howler monkeys, harpy eagles, sloths, big cats and pink river dolphins.

Performed in Czech Black style by puppeteers Brian Harrison, Jake Krakovsky, Emily MarshTim Sweeney and Anna Claire Walker. For ages 4 and up.

$19.50 non-members; $9.75 members. 10 + 11 a.m. Tuesday-Friday; 11 a.m. + 1 p.m. Saturday; and 1 + 3 p.m. Sunday. 1404 Spring St. NW. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.873.3391.

Next week

Behzod Abduraimov

Behzod Abduraimov

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. MARCH 8 + 10.

Guest conductor Henrik Nánási, general music director of the Komische Oper Berlin, leads a program featuring Uzbek pianist Behzod Abduraimov on Prokofiev’s Third Piano Concerto, Hungarian composer Zoltán Kodály’s Dances of Galánta and R. Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben, with concertmaster David Coucheron

$22-$97. 8 nightly. Symphony Hall, Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 Peachtree St. NE. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.733.5000.

Coming up

James Taylor Odom. Photo: Jeremy Daniel

James Taylor Odom. Photo: Jeremy Daniel

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder. MARCH 13-18.

This 2014 best-musical Tony winner tells the story of an heir to a family fortune who sets out to jump the line of succession by eliminating the eight pesky relatives who stand in his way. The Hollywood Reporter said the show “restores our faith in musical comedy.” An NPR critic said he’s “never laughed so hard at a Broadway musical.”

The company famously features one actor as all eight — male and female — doomed family members (here that actor is Lawrenceville native James Taylor Odom). Murder ran for three years and also won Tonys for direction and costume design.

$30-$105.50. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday; 8 p.m. Friday; 2 + 8 p.m. Saturday; 1 + 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Broadway in Atlanta at the Fox Theatre, 660 Peachtree St. NE. Details, tickets HERE or at 855.285.8499.

Ben Mitchell (from left), Maggie Birgel, Nicolas Carleo, Allie Southwood. Photo: Dan Carmody / Studio 7

Ben Mitchell (from left), Maggie Birgel, Nicolas Carleo, Allie Southwood. Photo: Dan Carmody / Studio 7

And Then They Came for Me: Remembering the World of Anne Frank. MARCH 13 ONLY.

At Georgia Ensemble Theatre. Anne’s childhood friends Eva Schloss and Ed Silverberg recount their stories via video as actors portray the two, and others, onstage. Schloss describes memories from the day her family — and the Franks — went into hiding. On Eva’s 15thbirthday, Nazis arrested her family and sent them to concentration camps. The cast: Ben Mitchell, Maggie Birgel, Nicolas Carleo and Allie Southwood. Erin Bushko directs.

$10. 7 p.m.  At the Roswell Cultural Arts Center, 950 Forrest St., Roswell. Details, tickets HERE or at 770.641.1260. 

 

 

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BEST BETS | Feb. 8-14, 2018

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater arrives, Aurora’s “Maytag Virgin” departs, and attention is paid to two of America’s greatest playwrights — Tony Kushner (“Angels” at Actor’s Express) and August Wilson (“King Hedley II” at True Colors Theatre). Pictured: Jimmica Collins and Caitlin Hargraves in “The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane” at Synchronicity Theatre. Photo by Jerry Siegel.

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater arrives, Aurora’s “Maytag Virgin” departs, and attention is paid to two of America’s greatest playwrights — Tony Kushner (“Angels” at Actor’s Express) and August Wilson (“King Hedley II” at True Colors Theatre). Pictured: Jimmica Collins and Caitlin Hargraves in “The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane” at Synchronicity Theatre. Photo by Jerry Siegel.

**  INDICATES AN ENCORE ATLANTA WINTER SEASON TOP PICK.

Recommended

A scene from the Robert Battle-choreographed “Mass.” Photo: Paul Kolnik

A scene from the Robert Battle-choreographed “Mass.” Photo: Paul Kolnik

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. FEB. 14-18.

This brilliant, one-of-a-kind 32-member company makes its annual Atlanta visit with a program that looks to the past — specifically 1960, the 1980s and 2004 — to entertain, provoke and inform the future. The lineup includes six performances and 13 pieces (not all seen at every performance). Among them: artistic director Robert Battle’s MassShelter by Jawole Willa Jo Zollar; Twyla Tharp’s The Golden Section; Talley Beatty’s Stack-Up; and the Alvin Ailey creation Revelations (which concludes every performance). 

$22-$86. 8 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 2 + 8 p.m. Saturday; and 3 p.m. Sunday. Fox Theatre, 660 Peachtree St. NE. Tickets HERE or at 855.285.8499.

[AILEY’S ROBERT BATTLE: ‘THE BLACK EXPERIENCE IS NOT A ONE-NOTE SAMBA’]

Parris Sarter, Grant Chapman. Photo: Ashley Earles-Bennett

Parris Sarter, Grant Chapman. Photo: Ashley Earles-Bennett

** Angels in America, Parts 1 and 2. THROUGH FEB. 17, IN ROTATING REPERTORY.

At Actor‘s Express. See both.

Your time investment will be mostly rewarded. Sex, religion, politics and history collide in Tony Kushner’s time-traveling saga set at the dawn of the AIDS epidemic. Part 1 is titled Millennium Approaches; Part 2 is Perestroika. Kushner’s achievement, a 20th-century theatrical landmark, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and four 1993 Tony awards. The Express cast: Robert Bryan Davis as Roy Cohn and Grant Chapman as Prior Walter, with Carolyn CookThandiwe DeShazorLouis GreggoryCara MantellaParris Sarter and Joe Sykes, several of whom play multiple roles.

$22-$40. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 2 + 8 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. King Plow Arts Center, 887 West Marietta St. NW. Millennium Approaches details, tickets HEREPerestroika details, tickets HERE. Or call 404.607.7469. 

[SEE: THE STAGES OF WINTER —  ENCORE NAMES THE BEST OF THE SEASON]

Amari Cheatum, Brittany Inge. Photo: Greg Mooney

Amari Cheatum, Brittany Inge. Photo: Greg Mooney

** The Ballad of Klook and Vinette. THROUGH FEB. 18.

American premiere. Horizon Theatre tells a contemporary love story with a soulful jazz score. Klook is a drifter who’s tired of drifting; Vinette is on the run but doesn’t know why. Together, they take a stab at love. 

Amari Cheatom (the film Django Unchained and a Freddie Hendricks Youth Ensemble of Atlanta alum) is Klook. Brittany Inge (Horizon’s Blackberry Daze) is Vinette. The script is by London-based playwright Ché Walker, who directs. 

$23 and up, plus fees. 8 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 3 + 8 p.m. Saturday; 5 p.m. Sunday. 1083 Austin Ave. at Euclid Avenue. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.584.7450.

 

Courtney Patterson.

Courtney Patterson.

** Maytag Virgin. CLOSES SUNDAY.

Regional premiere at Aurora TheatreAudrey Cefaly’s dramatic comedy follows an Alabama schoolteacher (Courtney Patterson) and her new neighbor (Brad Brinkley) in the year following her husband’s unexpected death. DC Theatre Scene called this comic-drama “a witty and earnest meditation on how people connect even when they feel they’re not ready.” Melissa Foulger, an Actor’s Express regular and a name you should know, directs. Cefaly is a playwright to keep your eyes on.

$20-$55. 8 tonight-Friday; 2:30 + 8 p.m. Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

128 E. Pike St., Lawrenceville. Free, covered, attached parking in city deck at 153 E. Crogan St. Details, tickets HERE or at 678.226.6222. Discount tickets at PoshDealz.com.

 

Josh Brook, with Edward. Photo: Jerry Siegel

Josh Brook, with Edward. Photo: Jerry Siegel

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane. THROUGH FEB. 25.

At Synchronicity Theatre

Edward Tulane is an expensive toy rabbit made of china who’s loved by a little girl but must go on a miraculous journey before he can love anyone back. This family-friendly adaptation — which includes toy piano, harmonica, guitar and banjo music — is told simply and elegantly by a versatile cast of four: Josh Brook, Jimmica Collins, Caitlin Hargraves and Justin Walker. 

Mira Hirsch directs. The piece is based on Newbery Medalist Kate DiCamillo’s 2006 novel. Note: Every Friday is PJs & Play. Kids in pajamas get complimentary milk and cookies. Runs two hours with one intermission.

$15-$22. 7 p.m. Friday; 1 + 4 p.m. Saturday; 2 + 5 p.m. Sunday. One Peachtree Pointe, 1545 Peachtree St. NE. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.484.8636. 

 

Opening this week

Seun Soyemi, Brittany L. Smith. Photo: Chris Bartelski

Seun Soyemi, Brittany L. Smith. Photo: Chris Bartelski

Ontario Was Here. OPENS SATURDAY.

At Aurora Theatre. Kansas-based playwright Darren Canady, the 2007 winner of the Alliance/Kendeda National Graduate Playwriting Competition, returns to metro Atlanta with this drama. It  follows two social workers  (Brittany L. SmithSeun Soyemi) on the front lines of Kansas City’s Department of Children and Families. Tempers flash when the co-workers (and ex-lovers) clash over what’s best for a 9-year-old boy named Ontario. The stakes are life and death.  

Cynthia D. Barker, better known for her work onstage, directs. This show is part of Aurora’s Harvel Lab Series, done in its smaller black-box space.

$20-$30. Through March 4. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday.  

Free, covered, attached parking in city deck at 153 E. Crogan St. Details, tickets HERE or at 678.226.6222. Discount tickets at PoshDealz.com.

 

This weekend only

biolgASO-Chorus

Mozart’s “Requiem.”  THURSDAY + SATURDAY-SUNDAY. 

Italian-born guest conductor Roberto Abbado leads the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorusin Mozart’s 1791 masterpiece, written as he was dying. The orchestra and chorus are joined by soloists Jessica Rivera(soprano), Magdalena Wór (mezzo-soprano), William Burden (tenor) and Tom McNichols (bass). Also scheduled: Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 1, with guest artist Jorge Federico Osorio, who has been spending a lot of time in Atlanta lately.

$32-$108. 8 p.m. Thursday + Saturday (Saturday nearly sold out); 3 p.m. Sunday (call the ASO for tickets).

Symphony Hall, Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 Peachtree St. NE. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.733.5000.

Still running

Abagail Dawkins (from left), Diany Rodriguez, Anna Haworth. Photo: StunGun Photography

Abagail Dawkins (from left), Diany Rodriguez, Anna Haworth. Photo: StunGun Photography

** The Followers; A Retelling of the Bacchae. THROUGH FEB. 25. 

At 7 Stages. The 38-year-old L5P company looks to ancient Greece for its first production of 2018. Euripides’ The Bacchae delves into opposite sides of human nature and is surprisingly topical with its warning about blindly following political leaders.  This world premiere telling comes from Margaret Baldwin, an Atlanta playwright of note, and uses opera, dance, puppetry and physical theater to tell its story of blind faith, abuse of power and vengeance.

Michael Haverty directs. Klimchak, who builds and plays unusual instruments, provides original music, with musical direction by Bryan Mercer and Ofir Nahari choreographing. In the Back Stage Black Box. Runs 80 minutes with no intermission.

$15-$25). 8 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday + Saturday; 5 p.m. Sunday. 1105 Euclid Ave. NE. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.523.7647.

Terrance Smith, Rachel Wansker.

Terrance Smith, Rachel Wansker.

The Mystery of Love & Sex. THROUGH FEB. 18.  

At Out Front Theatre Company.

London-born playwright Bathsheba “Bash” Doran’s four-character drama is an unexpected love story about where souls meet and the consequences of growing up. Charlotte and Jonny have been best friends since age 9. She’s Jewish, he’s Christian; he’s black, she’s white. Their differences intensify their connection until the complications of sexual desire tiptoe in.

The drama premiered in 2014 at Lincoln Center (“written with compassion and wry wisdom,” said The New York Times) and has played Chicago and Los Angeles. Doran also has written for TV (“Boardwalk Empire,” “Masters of Sex,” “Smash”). Working Title Playwrights‘ Amber Bradshaw directs a cast comprising Donald McNamusTiffany Morgan, Terrance Smith and Rachel Wansker. Note: Contains nudity. 

$20 + $25. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday.

999 Brady Ave. in West Midtown. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.448.2755.

 

Shannon McCarren, Blake Burgess.

Shannon McCarren, Blake Burgess.

Picnic. THROUGH FEB. 18. At Stage Door Players

William Inge’s 1953 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama argues that youth is a gift to be savored, not squandered.

When Labor Day weekend arrives in the Kansas backyards of two middle-aged widows, so does a vital young man who upsets the social order.

The cast: Blake BurgessKara Cantrell, Larry Davis and Shelby Folks. Tess Malis Kincaid directs. Inge (Bus Stop; Come Back, Little Sheba)was known for bringing small-town life in the American Midwest to Broadway.

$33. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Also at 8 p.m. Feb. 15. 

5339 Chamblee Dunwoody Road, Dunwoody. Details, tickets HERE or at 770.396.1726.

Photo: David Zeiger

Photo: David Zeiger

Rainforest Adventures. THROUGH MARCH 4.

Return to the Amazonian jungle with the Center for Puppetry Arts.

Brazilian music accompanies this communion with 30-plus exotic plants and animals, including howler monkeys, harpy eagles, sloths, big cats and pink river dolphins.

Performed in Czech Black style by puppeteers Brian Harrison, Jake Krakovsky, Emily MarshTim Sweeney and Anna Claire Walker. For ages 4 and up.

$19.50 non-members; $9.75 members. 10 + 11 a.m. Tuesday-Friday; 11 a.m. + 1 p.m. Saturday; and 1 + 3 p.m. Sunday.

1404 Spring St. NW. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.873.3391.

 

Next week

Jorge Federico Osorio

Jorge Federico Osorio

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. FEB. 15 + 17. 

Italian maestro Roberto Abbado returns For Franz Schubert’s haunting Unfinished symphony. And guest pianist Jorge Federico Osorio (“a serious and cultivated Beethoven player,” says the Chicago Tribune) leads Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4, completing the ASO’s performances of all five Beethoven piano concertos this season. 

Also scheduled: Rossini’s overture to Semiramide.

$17-$97. 8 nightly.

Symphony Hall, Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 Peachtree St. NE. Details, tickets HERE or at 404.733.5000.

August Wilson, in 2003.

August Wilson, in 2003.

** King Hedley II. PREVIEWS FEB. 13, OPENS FEB. 14. 

At True Colors Theatre Company

August Wilson (1945-2005) is one of the great American playwrights of any century, and a personal favorite. King Hedley II is part of his 10-play Century, or Pittsburgh, Cycle, all reflecting the black experience in 20th-century America. King (Neal A. Ghant, fresh from the Alliance Theatre’s Native Guard) is an ex-con peddling stolen refrigerators in inner-city Pittsburgh in the 1980s.

His goal: Buy a new business and thus, a new life. Surrounding him for better or worse in his quest are his wife, his mother, his mother’s ex-lover, his best friend and a neighbor named Stool Pigeon (Eddie Bradley), a mystical sort of truthsayer. Also in the cast: Tiffany Denise HobbsTonia Jackson, E. Roger Mitchell and Eugene H. Russell IV). Jamil Jude directs. Some consider King Hedley II a tragedy of Shakespearean proportions. It seemed so in a mesmerizing production at the Alliance in 2003/04. Recommended for age 16 and up (language, content).

$20-$35 ($25 preview Tuesday). 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 2:30 + 7:30 p.m.  Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. 

Southwest Arts Center, 915 New Hope Road SW. Details HERE, tickets at Ticket Alternative HERE or at 877.725.8849.

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STILL ROARING - THE LION KING

Rafiki (Buyi Zama) opens “The Lion King” by calling all the animals to celebrate the day with “Circle of Life.” Photo: Joan Marcus

Rafiki (Buyi Zama) opens “The Lion King” by calling all the animals to celebrate the day with “Circle of Life.” Photo: Joan Marcus

PEEK BEHIND THE MIGHTY MASKS AND PUPPET-COMBO COSTUMES WITH THE LION KING‘S LONGTIME PUPPET-KEEPER AND ITS NALA, NORCROSS’ NIA HOLLOWAY

The North American tour of “The Lion King” runs Jan. 10-28 at the Fox Theatre. Details, tickets HERE or at 855.285.8499.

FOR NIA HOLLOWAY, it was a childhood highlight: the family gathering by the TV to watch Disney’s The Lion King, the 1994 animated movie that won two Oscars and two Golden Globe awards.

Nia Holloway, who grew up in Norcross, has been playing Nala nationwide for five years. She calls the lion princess “a fierce symbol of strength and girl power.” Photo: Joan Marcus

Nia Holloway, who grew up in Norcross, has been playing Nala nationwide for five years. She calls the lion princess “a fierce symbol of strength and girl power.” Photo: Joan Marcus

“We would get a whole bucket of ice cream, and Mom would let us eat it,” she says. “I knew that movie front to back.”

The movie, which takes place in a kingdom of African lions, was influenced by Shakespeare’s Hamlet. It, in turn, influenced Holloway. By age 4, she’d sing for anyone. “I was never that kid who was too shy,” she says. She favored Erykah Badu’s “Bag Lady” or anything by Destiny’s Child.

At 9, she auditioned to play young Nala in a tour of the stage musical, a dream done in by her height —salready 5-feet-6. In Act 1 of the show, children play Nala and Simba, her intended mate.

At 11, Holloway was 5-feet-9. Growing up in Norcross, the eldest of three sisters, she topped out at 5-feet-10 and played on the 2013 Norcross High School team that won a state basketball championship.

Then she auditioned for another Lion King tour. The Atlanta casting call was for ages 18 and older. Holloway was 17, “but something told me to just step out and take a chance.” She sang her go-to audition song, Beyonce’s “Listen.” She heard nothing for a month, then emailed the casting director.

“I was determined,” she says.

 

Dashaun Young is the grown-up Simba. Photo: Joan Marcus

Dashaun Young is the grown-up Simba. Photo: Joan Marcus

She became the grown-up Nala and, since she wasn’t yet of legal age, her dad joined her on tour. She finished high school online, with tutors in every city.

That was almost five years ago. She’s done Nala across North America ever since.

Now 22, Holloway will play her 2,000th performance later this year.

“I still get chills at the top of Pride Rock,” she says. “Even now, every time the curtain goes down, tired or not, I’m still like, ‘Wow, can you believe it, you’re in The Lion King!’

 

 

She just couldn’t wait to be queen

She’s also happy to be coming home.

Nia Holloway: Happy to be coming home.

Nia Holloway: Happy to be coming home.

“I get to sleep in my own room, in my own bed. And I’ll get my mom’s cooking. And my sisters.” Sisters Audrey and Naomi are studying law, but music is a family tradition. Grandmother Loleatta Holloway sang disco (“Hit and Run,” “Love Sensation”); great-grandmother Sylvia Shemwell sang backup for Elvis.

Holloway gets emotional when talking about her parents, who were teenagers when they married and had her. “People told them they were nothing and that their baby — me — would be nothing. But they’re strong, resilient and amazing. I love them so much for believing in me, and I owe them everything.”

Leaving home at 17 makes it easier for her to relate to Nala, she says, calling the princess a “very strong and dynamic, yet vulnerable, character. She’s a young warrior but also just a teenager thrown into a situation where she must find help and discover her own journey. She’s a fierce symbol of strength and girl power. All of those things relate to me.”

 

‘A certain kind of magic’

The wildly creative masks and puppet-combo costumes that Holloway and her 47 cast mates wear started on Broadway with director Julie Taymor and designer Michael Curry, who didn’t want actors to be stuck in animal suits unable to express emotion with their eyes and faces.

The costumes — human and animal at the same time — allowed the animated story to be told onstage.

“It’s a certain kind of magic,” says Michael Reilly, this tour’s puppet master. “You experience what the animal is feeling through the human.”

“It’s a lot of work, but it’s also a jubilant atmosphere,” says puppet-keeper Michael Reilly. Photo: Joan Marcus

“It’s a lot of work, but it’s also a jubilant atmosphere,” says puppet-keeper Michael Reilly. Photo: Joan Marcus

The original, now in its 21st year on Broadway, was named the best musical of 1998 and also won Tony awards for its scenic, costume and lighting designs; choreography; and direction.

Holloway wears Nala’s mask-face as a headpiece. It’s made of a super-strong but lightweight carbon fiber.

Her Balinese movements, Reilly says, help the mask move in different ways. “When she stretches, or ducks her head, she’s able to articulate her body to make the mask look like it’s alive.”

Other beastly puppet-costumes are more cumbersome or complex, says Reilly, who oversees repair and maintenance of 230 handmade puppets, ranging in size from Scar’s pet mouse (5 inches long) to a 13-foot-long elephant.

 

Photo: Joan Marcus

Photo: Joan Marcus

Pumbaa, the warthog, is the heaviest puppet, at 43 pounds. The actor playing Zazu, the hornbill, has a lot of buttons and levers. They move his mouth and eyes, flap his wings, or extend or retract his neck. The actor playing the villainous Scar must operate hand controls while moving and delivering his lines.

“Using his finger controls, Scar can drop his mechanical mask in front of his face and become more lion-like,” Reilly says, “or he can put it on top of his head and be more human-like. He can work with those two parameters to tell us how angry he is at the moment.”

Reilly’s been tending to Lion King upkeep for 15 years and says he’d sign on for the next tour, too. “It’s a lot of work, but it’s also a jubilant atmosphere.”

His favorite costume is Mufasa’s: “I love that his mask represents the sun and the circle of life. It’s beautiful but so hard to fix.” Mufasa’s mane is made of lightweight wood pieces that are “always breaking, so we are constantly gluing and painting.”

Reilly’s chief mission is to keep Taymor’s vision alive “so that The Lion King not only looks as good as it did on Day 1, it all operates like it’s Day 1, too.”

As long as he has zip ties and gaffer’s tape, the circle of life will go on. And on, and on, and on, it seems.

Photo: Joan Marcus

Photo: Joan Marcus

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GOODNIGHT, SWEET PRINCE

Longtime Atlanta Ballet artistic director John McFall is saluted by his dancers during the 2016 staging of his “Nutcracker.” Photo: Kim Kenney

Longtime Atlanta Ballet artistic director John McFall is saluted by his dancers during the 2016 staging of his “Nutcracker.” Photo: Kim Kenney

AFTER MORE THAN 500 PERFORMANCES AND 23 SEASONS, ATLANTA BALLET DANCES  JOHN McFALL’S ‘NUTCRACKER’ FOR THE LAST TIME.

“Atlanta Ballet’s Nutcracker” makes it annual visit to the Fox Theatre, opening Dec. 8 and running through Dec. 28. Tickets, details HERE. 

AS THE BYRDS SANG a half-century ago, “to everything there is a season, turn, turn, turn.”

Even if your Nutcracker ballet is as pretty as a Christmas card. Even if it has a splendid balance of humor, beauty and elegance. And enough clever and dynamic choreography and rosy-cheeked children. Even then, change is inevitable.

Retired artistic director John McFall says his “Nut” has a “Las Vegas-style of theatrical lifts and a bit of circus. More gusto and a sense of enthusiasm.” Photo: Charlie McCullers

Retired artistic director John McFall says his “Nut” has a “Las Vegas-style of theatrical lifts and a bit of circus. More gusto and a sense of enthusiasm.” Photo: Charlie McCullers

This year is the 23rd and final presentation of just such a Nutcracker: the successful and imaginative rendering that John McFall, as artistic director, created decades ago for Atlanta Ballet. McFall retired in 2016, and his Nutcracker follows suit when this season’s final curtain falls Dec. 28.

Before McFall, the company mostly staged George Balanchine’s traditional version of the holiday ballet set to Peter Tchaikovsky’s music. McFall’s successor, the Bolshi-trained Gennadi Nedvigin, will debut a new Nutcracker in 2018.

The story of a nutcracker doll that comes to life and turns into a prince, and a young girl’s fantasy adventure, has always lent itself to creative interpretation. McFall calls Tchaikovsky’s lush and sprightly 1892 score “film music — way ahead of its time.”

In McFall’s Nutcracker, the audience is transported to a Christmas party at the Petrov home in St. Petersburg, Russia, circa 1850. Costumes by Judanna Lynn, and scenery by Peter Horne and Michael Hagen, have been praised for evoking that time and place as has McFall’s sense of whimsy and wonder.

McFall takes his sweet time with that party scene, inviting us to sit back and bask in the merriment. Before too long, though, he serves up a comedic and athletically rigorous “battle of the rats.”

 

This “Nutcracker” likely will be remembered for its beauty, enchantment, magical moments and storytelling, Atlanta Ballet dancers say. Photo: Kim Kenney

This “Nutcracker” likely will be remembered for its beauty, enchantment, magical moments and storytelling, Atlanta Ballet dancers say. Photo: Kim Kenney

From a breathtaking scene with a gentle snowfall and a dozen Snowflakes weaving in and out of one another, to some classical pas de deux, there’s also intricate choreography to please serious dance fans.

For what will this Nutcracker be remembered? Its overall beauty and enchantment, many magical moments and a sharp focus on storytelling. That’s the word from dancers Nadia Mara and Jacob Bush, who have each danced lead roles over the years.

There are always several casts performing the Nut, so depending on which one you see, Mara this year may dance the Snow Queen, Sugar Plum Fairy or Dew Drop Fairy. Bush will do the Snow King (his favorite, “because the pas de deux is amazing, and I just get swept away”), the Sugar Plum Fairy’s Cavalier or Drosselmeyer the toymaker.

It’s the enigmatic Drosselmeyer who takes the girl Marya on her eye-popping journey to a land of snow and crystal, the Sugar Candy Kingdom and an exotic ball showcasing cultural dances.

Photo: Kim Kenney

Photo: Kim Kenney

McFall suggests that his Nutcracker has a “women’s lib” vibe. His Marya “liberates herself and discovers her world is filled with possibility. She is courageous, defines herself and shatters the glass ceiling.”

Deepening the storytelling may be McFall’s top strength, say Mara and Bush.

“I’ve seen lots of Nutcrackers and some have seemed a bit two-dimensional,” Bush says. “John has always been very good at using every character, including every kid onstage, and they don’t jump up and down. Every one of them is given specific steps and is encouraged to be part of the story.”

“John spent so much time on the details,” says dancer Nadia Mara (center). “That’s how to get everyone caught up in a story.” Photo: Charlie McCullers

“John spent so much time on the details,” says dancer Nadia Mara (center). “That’s how to get everyone caught up in a story.” Photo: Charlie McCullers

Says Mara: “John spent so much time on the details. That’s how to get everyone caught up in a story.”

Some 200 youngsters from the Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education perform annually in this Nutcracker.

“Audiences return year after year if the production is theatrical, vibrant and inspiring,” McFall says. “There has to be a rhythm and pace that invigorates and stimulates.”

To keep the Nutcracker story moving, McFall rearranged some musical sequences. American audiences, he says, “are easily bored, so less is better. I omitted or edited what might be described as 19th-century storytelling. My version has a Las Vegas-style of theatrical lifts and a bit of circus. More gusto and a sense of enthusiasm.”

McFall interrupted his retirement to prepare the company for this final Nutcracker of his. Nedvigin worked alongside him the past two seasons and called it a “wonderful experience.”

“John McFall’s version of Atlanta Ballet’s Nutcracker has touched the lives of so many children and families throughout the past two decades,” Nedvigin says.

Photo: Kim Kenney

Photo: Kim Kenney

It’s too soon for Nedvigin to say much about next year’s new Nutcracker, but he does say he’s gathered a “top-notch” creative team. It includes renowned choreographer Yuri Possokhov, formerly of the Bolshoi and San Francisco ballets. His Cinderella for the Bolshoi (2006) and Don Quixote for the Joffrey Ballet (2011) are among his many triumphs. Atlanta Ballet danced his Firebird last April.

What Nedvigin will say is that the next Nut will be “extraordinary” and “take audiences on a journey that is truly larger than life.”

For now, we have a twilight moment for this long-loved Nutcracker.

“It is truly dear to my heart,” Mara says. “I love doing the Sugar Plum Fairy. It doesn’t matter if I’ve done it a hundred times. I still get goose bumps. And I love that feeling. We don’t get to have happy goose bumps all the time.”

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SUZI NOMINATIONS: ALLIANCE, AURORA DOMINATE

Synchronicity Theatre’s “Eclipsed” received seven nominations, including best ensemble of a play. The cast included Charity Purvis Jordan (left) and Asha Duniani plus Isake Akanke, Shayla Love and Parris Sarter. Photo by Jerry Siegel

Synchronicity Theatre’s “Eclipsed” received seven nominations, including best ensemble of a play. The cast included Charity Purvis Jordan (left) and Asha Duniani plus Isake Akanke, Shayla Love and Parris Sarter. Photo by Jerry Siegel

ATLANTA THEATER’S 2017 SUZI NOMINATIONS HONOR 13 METRO COMPANIES AND 43 PRODUCTIONS. HOW MANY DID YOU SEE?

THE ALLIANCE THEATRE producing on two stages, leads 2017 Suzi Bass Award hopefuls with 42 nominations, followed by Aurora Theatre (24), Actor’s Express (19), Horizon Theatre (14) and Synchronicity Theatre (11). The Alliance is the largest theater in the Southeast.

Aurora Theatre’s “The Bridges of Madison County” (with nominees Travis Smith and Kristin Markiton) tied with the Alliance Theatre’s “The Prom” as the most-nominated production. Photo: Chris Bartelski

Aurora Theatre’s “The Bridges of Madison County” (with nominees Travis Smith and Kristin Markiton) tied with the Alliance Theatre’s “The Prom” as the most-nominated production. Photo: Chris Bartelski

In all, 13 professional theater companies were recognized with nominations for Atlanta’s version of Broadway’s Tony awards.

Production-wise, the nominees are led by The Bridges of Madison County at Aurora and The Prom at the Alliance (both with 12); The Crucible at Actor’s Express (11); Nobody Loves You at Horizon (10); and Troubadour at the Alliance (9).

The 13th annual Suzi Bass Awards happen Nov. 6 at the Conant Performing Arts Center at Oglethorpe University. The evening includes awards, performances and a reception with nibbles and a cash bar. Tickets to the general public will be on sale soon. The awards were founded in 2003 to celebrate outstanding work in live theater and the artists who produce it.        

THE NOMINEES

Outstanding world premiere

  • The Prom at the Alliance Theatre
  • Singles in Agriculture at Aurora Theatre
  • Strait of Gibraltar at Synchronicity Theatre
  • Too Heavy for Your Pocket at the Alliance 
  • Troubadour at the Alliance
The Alliance Theatre’s “Too Heavy for Your Pocket” is nominated for best world premiere. Its cast (from left) Eboni Flowers, Rob Demery, Stephen Ruffin and Markita Prescott. Photo: Greg Mooney

The Alliance Theatre’s “Too Heavy for Your Pocket” is nominated for best world premiere. Its cast (from left) Eboni Flowers, Rob Demery, Stephen Ruffin and Markita Prescott. Photo: Greg Mooney

Play

  • The Crucible at Actor’s Express

  • Eclipsed at Synchronicity 

  • King Henry VI Parts 1, 2, & 3 at the Shakespeare Tavern Playhouse
  • Singles in Agriculture at Aurora 
  • Ugly Lies the Bone at the Alliance 

Direction/play

  • Justin Anderson for Singles in Agriculture at Aurora 
  • Freddie Ashley for The Crucible at Actor’s Express
  • Jessica Holt for Ugly Lies the Bone at the Alliance 
  • Tinashe Kajese-Bolden for Eclipsed at Synchronicity 
  • Jeff Watkins for King Henry VI Parts 1, 2, & 3 at the Shakespeare Tavern Playhouse

Female lead actor/play

  • Cynthia D. Barker for The Mountaintop (Aurora)
  • Lauren Lane for Singles in Agriculture (Aurora)
  • Julie Jesneck for Ugly Lies the Bone (Alliance)
  • Christina Leidel for The Miracle Worker (Gypsy Theatre Company)
  • Brooke Owens for Anne Boleyn (Synchronicity)
  • Courtney Patterson for The Crucible (Actor’s Express)

Male lead actor/play

  • Jeremy Aggers for Singles in Agriculture (Aurora)
  • Neal Ghant for The Mountaintop (Aurora)
  • Jonathan Horne for The Crucible (Actor’s Express)
  • Brian Kurlander for How to Use a Knife (Horizon)
  • Geoffrey D. Williams for Thurgood (Theatrical Outfit)

Female featured actor/play

  • Shelli Delgado for The Crucible (Actor’s Express)
  • Ellen McQueen for The Tragedy of King Richard III (Shakespeare Tavern Playhouse)
  • Wendy Melkonian for Ugly Lies the Bone (Alliance)
  • Falashay Pearson for The Crucible (Actor’s Express)
  • Vallea E. Woodbury for Singles in Agriculture (Aurora)

Male featured actor/play

  • Adeoye for Moby Dick (Alliance)
  • Bryan Davis for The Crucible (Actor’s Express)
  • Jeff McKerley for The Legend of Georgia McBride (Actor’s Express)
  • Lee Osorio for Ugly Lies the Bone (Alliance)
  • Tamil Periasamy for The Crucible (Actor’s Express)
  • Drew Reeves for King Henry VI Parts 1, 2 & 3 (Shakespeare Tavern Playhouse)

Ensemble/play

  • The Canterbury Tales at Shakespeare Tavern Playhouse (Laura Cole, Nicholas Faircloth, Rivka Levin, Drew Reeves, Adam King, Enoch King, Amanda Lindsey, Kirstin Calvert)

  • The Comedy of Errors at Shakespeare Tavern Playhouse (Chris Hecke, Steve Hudson, Gina Rickicki, Andrew Houchins, J.L. Reed, Enoch King, Matt Felten, Jennifer Lamort, India S. Tyree, Matt Nitchie, Amanda Lindsey, Dani Herd)

  • Eclipsed at Synchronicity(Asha Duniani, Charity Purvis Jordan, Shayla Love, Parris Sarter, Isake Akanke)
  • Father Comes Home from the Wars (Parts 1, 2 & 3) at Actor’s Express (Seun Soyemi, Damian Lockhart, Meagan Dilworth, Jason-Jamal Ligon, Rob Cleveland, Evan Cleaver, Brittany Inge, Marcus Hopkins-Turner, Richard McDonald, Bryan Davis)
  • Too Heavy for Your Pocket at the Alliance (Rob Demery, Eboni Flowers, Markita Prescott, Stephen Ruffin)

Costume design/play

  • Deyah Brenner for The Legend of Georgia McBride (Actor’s Express)

  • Anné Carole Butler for King Henry VI Parts 1, 2, & 3 (Shakespeare Tavern)

  • Nyrobi Moss for Eclipsed (Synchronicity)
  • Abby Parker for Anne Boleyn (Synchronicity)
  • Erik Teague for The Crucible (Actor’s Express)

Lighting design/play

  • William C. Kirkham for Moby Dick (Alliance)

  • Liz Lee for Ugly Lies the Bone (Alliance)

  • Joseph P. Monaghan III for The Crucible (Actor’s Express)
  • Mary Parker for Constellations at (Horizon)
  • Kathy A. Perkins for Eclipsed (Synchronicity)

Scenic design/play

  • Isabel Curley-Clay & Moriah Curley-Clay for Appropriate (Actor’s Express)

  • Isabel Curley-Clay & Moriah Curley-Clay for Eclipsed (Synchronicity)

  • Isabel Curley-Clay & Moriah Curley-Clay for Freed Spirits (Horizon)
  • Isabel Curley-Clay & Moriah Curley-Clay for How to Use a Knife (Horizon)
  • Leslie Taylor for The Legend of Georgia McBride (Actor’s Express)

Sound design/play

  • Preston Goodson for The Legend of Georgia McBride (Actor’s Express)

  • Chika Kaba Ma’atunde for Simply Simone (Theatrical Outfit)

  • Kate Marvin for Ugly Lies the Bone (Alliance)
  • Kay Richardson for Eclipsed (Synchronicity)
  • Ed Thrower for The Crucible (Actor’s Express)

Musical

  • Big Fish at Theatrical Outfit
  • The Bridges of Madison County at Aurora 
  • Nobody Loves You at Horizon Theatre
  • The Prom at the Alliance 
  • Troubadour at the Alliance 

Direction of a musical

  • Justin Anderson for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora)

  • Susan V. Booth for Troubadour (Alliance)

  • Brian Clowdus for Grease (Serenbe Playhouse)
  • Heidi McKerley for Nobody Loves You (Horizon)
  • Casey Nicholaw for The Prom (Alliance)

Musical direction

  • Brandon Bush for Troubadour (Alliance)

  • Mary-Mitchell Campbell for The Prom (Alliance)

  • Alli Lingenfelter for Nobody Loves You (Horizon)
  • Chika Kaba Ma’atunde for Simply Simone (Theatrical Outfit)
  • Ann-Carol Pence for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora)

Choreography

  • Ricardo Aponte for The Legend of Georgia McBride (Actor’s Express)

  • Bubba Carr for Grease (Serenbe)

  • Heidi Cline McKerley & Jeff McKerley for Nobody Loves You (Horizon)
  • Casey Nicholaw for The Prom (Alliance)
  • Melissa Zaremba for Smokey Joe’s Cafe (Legacy Theatre)

Musical lead actor/female 

  • Kylie Brown for Ghost the Musical (Georgia Ensemble Theatre)

  • Randi Garza for Grease (Serenbe)

  • Caitlin Kinnunen for The Prom (Alliance)
  • Beth Leavel for The Prom (Alliance)
  • Kristin Markiton for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora)

Musical lead actor/male

  • Brooks Ashmanskas for The Prom (Alliance)

  • Andrew Benator for Troubadour (Alliance)

  • Chase Peacock for Ghost the Musical (Georgia Ensemble)
  • Travis Smith for Big Fish (Theatrical Outfit)
  • Travis Smith for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora) 

Musical featured actor/female

  • Jennifer Alice Acker for Nobody Loves You (Horizon)

  • Kandice Arrington for Ghost the Musical (Georgia Ensemble)

  • Wendy Melkonian for Nobody Loves You (Horizon)
  • Valarie Payton for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora)
  • Julissa Sabino for Grease (Serenbe)

Musical featured actor/male

  • Rob Cleveland for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora)

  • Don Finney for The Threepenny Opera (7 Stages)

  • Matt Lewis for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora)
  • Brad Raymond for Nobody Loves You (Horizon)
  • Austin Tijerina for Nobody Loves You (Horizon)

Ensemble/musical

  • Church Basement Ladies at the Legacy Theatre (Amanda Lyn Hornberger, Autumn O’Ryan, Katie Patterson, Nikki Savitt, Jeremy Skidmore)

  • Company at Actor’s Express (Lowrey Brown, Rhyn Saver, Daniel Burns, Jimmica Collins, Laura Floyd, Dan Ford, Jill Hames, Steve Hudson, Phillip Lynch, Kelly Chapin Martin, Jessica Miesel, Emily Stembridge, Craig Waldrip, Libby Whittemore

  • Million Dollar Quartet, a Georgia Ensemble & Atlanta Lyric Theatre co-production (Chase Peacock, Allison Wilhoit, Chris Damiano, Christopher Kent, Justin D. Thompson, Ethan Ray Parker, Andrew Patton, Kroy Presley)
  • Smokey Joe’s Cafe at the Legacy (Nick Abbott, Amanda Bridgette, Brian L. Boyd, Meg Dickens, Jordan Ellis, Rakeem Lawrence, Allie Richardson, Hillary Scales-Lewis, Christopher “CJ” Williams)

Costume design/musical

  • DeeDee Chmielewski for The Threepenny Opera (7 Stages)

  • Lex Liang for Troubadour (Alliance)

  • Brandon McWilliams for Grease (Serenbe)
  • Linda Patterson for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora)
  • Ann Roth & Matthew Pachtman for The Prom (Alliance)

Lighting design/musical

  • Bradley Bergeron for Grease (Serenbe)

  • Kevin Frazier for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora)

  • Kenneth Posner for The Prom (Alliance)
  • Bryan Rosengrant for Ghost the Musical (Georgia Ensemble)
  • Ken Yunker for Troubadour (Alliance)

Scenic design/musical

  • Kat Conley for Courtenay’s Cabaret: Home for the Holidays (Alliance)

  • Isabel Curley-Clay & Moriah Curley-Clay for Nobody Loves You (Horizon)

  • Scott Pask for The Prom at the (Alliance)
  • Julie Allardice Ray for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora)
  • Todd Rosenthal for Troubadour (Alliance)

Sound design/musical

  • Clay Benning for Troubadour (Alliance)

  • Rob Brooksher for Nobody Loves You (Horizon)

  • Preston Goodson for Ghost the Musical (Georgia Ensemble)
  • Peter Hylenski for The Prom at the (Alliance)
  • John McKenzie for Million Dollar Quartet (Georgia Ensemble & Atlanta Lyric)
  • Daniel Pope for The Bridges of Madison County (Aurora)

Outstanding production/Theater for Young Audiences

  • Cinderella and Fella at the Alliance

  • From Head to Toe at the Alliance 

  • Old MacDonald’s Farm at the Center for Puppetry Arts
  • The Three Billy Goats Gruff at Aurora 

New work/TYA

  • Cinderella and Fella at the Alliance

  • The Dancing Granny at the Alliance 

  • The Dancing Handkerchief at Theatrical Outfit
  • From Head to Toe at the Alliance 

Direction/TYA

  • Cinderella and Fella at the Alliance (director Rosemary Newcott, music director S. Renee Clark)

  • From Head to Toe at the Alliance (director Rosemary Newcott)

  • Old MacDonald’s Farm at the Center for Puppetry Arts (director Amy Sweeney)
  • The Three Billy Goats Gruff at Aurora Theatre (director Justin Anderson, musical director Ann-Carol Pence)

Ensemble/TYA

  • Cinderella and Fella at the Alliance (Terry Burrell, S. Renee Clark, Courtenay Collins, Molly Coyne, Scott E. DePoy, Jeremiah Parker Hobbs, India S. Tyree, Brian Walker)

  • Old MacDonald’s Farm at the Center for Puppetry Arts (Seth Langer, Amy Sweeney)

  • The One and Only Ivan at Synchronicity (Chris Hecke, Renita James, Benjamin DeWitt Sims, Jeffrey Sneed, Precious West)
  • The Three Billy Goats Gruff at Aurora (Jenise Cook, Elliott Felds, Juan Carlos Unzueta, Amber Hamilton, Candice Mclellan, Bryan Montemayor)

Design/TYA

  • Cinderella and Fella at the Alliance Theatre (scenic designer Kat Conley; costume designer Sydney Roberts; lighting designer Jake DeGroot; sound designer Clay Benning)

  • Cinderella Della Circus at the Center for Puppetry Arts (puppet designer Jason Hines; scenic designer Rochelle Barker Shinn; lighting designer Liz Lee; sound designers Mimi Epstein & Gregory Montague)

  • Old MacDonald’s Farm at the Center for Puppetry Arts (puppet designer Jason Hines; scenic designer Ryan Sbaratta; costume designer Carole D’Agostino; lighting designer Gregory Montague; sound designer Dolph Amick)
  • Robin Hood at Serenbe (scenic designer Scott Sargent; costume designer DeeDee Chmielewski; properties designer Stephanie Polhemus)
  • The Three Billy Goats Gruff at Aurora (scenic & costume designers Isabel Curley-Clay & Moriah Curley-Clay; lighting designer Andre C. Allen; sound designer Thom Jenkins)

NOMINATIONS BY PRODUCTION

12: The Bridges of Madison County & The Prom

11: The Crucible

10: Nobody Loves You 

9: Troubadour 

7: Eclipsed & Ugly Lies the Bone

6: Grease Singles in Agriculture 

5: Cinderella and FellaGhost the Musical & The Legend of Georgia McBride

4: King Henry VI Parts 1, 2, & 3Old MacDonald’s Farm & Three Billy Goats Gruff 

3: From Head to Toe 

2: Anne BoleynBig FishHow to Use a KnifeMillion Dollar QuartetThe MountaintopSimply SimoneSmokey Joe’s CaféThe Threepenny Opera; & Too Heavy for Your Pocket

1: Appropriate; Canterbury TalesChurch Basement LadiesCinderella Della CircusThe Comedy of ErrorsCompanyConstellationsCourtenay’s Cabaret: Home for the HolidaysThe Dancing GrannyThe Dancing HandkerchiefFather Comes Home from the Wars (Parts 1, 2 & 3)Freed SpiritsThe Miracle WorkerThe One and Only IvanRobin Hood; Strait of Gibraltar; ThurgoodThe Tragedy of King Richard III

NOMINATIONS BY COMPANY

42: Alliance Theatre 

24: Aurora Theatre 

19: Actor’s Express 

14: Horizon Theatre 

11: Synchronicity Theatre

7: Georgia Ensemble Theatre; Serenbe Playhouse; & Shakespeare Tavern Playhouse

6: Theatrical Outfit 

5: Center for Puppetry Arts 

3: Legacy Theatre 

2: 7 Stages

1: Gypsy Theatre Company