Tom Ford NYFW SPRING 2020 READY-TO-WEAR

How many times have you heard that the streets of New York are a runway? Well, the same is true of the subway, only maybe more so. There’s glamour and grit down there, same as above ground, but down below there’s a captive audience.

Tom Ford is the new chairman of the CFDA, and after starting in June his first move was to shorten New York Fashion Week. Simultaneous with the consolidation, designers have been producing more experiential events. We’ve seen bands, modern dancers, and a 75-person choir this week, but only Ford arranged for a private viewing of a disused platform of the Bowery stop on the J/Z line lit an electric pink for the occasion. Many of his 180 guests were surely subway first-timers, but the regular commuters got a big kick out of it too.

What is Mr. Slick doing in the subway? Ford’s notes made mention of the famous shot of Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick emerging out of a manhole cover. The subway also jibes with his new-since-last-season interest in simplicity. “I think that it’s a time for ease,” he wrote, “and in that way a return to the kind of luxurious sportswear that America has become known for all over the world.”

Enter look one: a jersey scoop-neck tee with the short sleeves rolled up to the shoulders and a duchesse satin skirt so white it was beaming. Not exactly subway-safe, it was low-key fabulous and synthesized the compelling high-low essence of the collection. Or consider another example: satin blazers cut characteristically strong and worn with elastic-waist nylon basketball shorts. “These torture me,” Ford wrote of the shorts, pointing out that he doesn’t let his son Jack wear them, even though his classmates do. “I’m always fascinated by things that ‘torture me.’” Ford didn’t play it completely contrary, though. The molded plastic tops were a luscious homage to Yves Saint Laurent’s Lalanne breastplates via Issey Miyake. And Ford’s tailored men’s jackets were typically loud and louche.

Connecting with one of the key messages of the season so far—let’s call it the nearly naked trend, for now—Ford threw a dress coat over a leather bra, cut a jumpsuit so it fell open to expose a strappy bikini top, and sent out a pair of slinky maillots. Of course, the millennial designers doing the same have probably been studying Ford’s old Gucci shows. That legacy of great American sportswear Ford was talking about? He has a stake in it. What’s new is old, that’s just how fashion works. Credit Ford, he’s expanding his vocabulary.

Source: VogueRunway

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Gypsy Sport NYFW SPRING 2020 READY-TO-WEAR

Gypsy-Sport nyfw 2020

Life is not always a beach for young designers trying to make it in fashion, and Rio Uribe of Gypsy Sport would know. Over the past six years he’s successfully navigated the changing tides of the industry, running a fully independent business with unwavering commitment. Still, when it’s all work and no play, there’s not much room left for creative daydreaming. Which is why, these days, Uribe is making a conscious effort to make more time for himself. With palms tree lining the runway, that joyous out-of-office attitude was in the air at his show today. Showgoers at the rooftop venue were clearly feeling the vibe, too, and sipped on fruit cocktails in the warm Indian summer evening.

The sunset tangerine and canary yellow palette of the clothes spoke directly to a permanent vacation mood. Shimmying out while covered in sparkling gold body paint, the first model set the tone, flaunting a party-starting halter-neck dress fashioned from hundreds of beaded safety pins. That ingenious approach to chainmail is one Uribe has been evolving for the past few seasons and is proving surprisingly popular despite—or perhaps because of—its unabashed fashion-forward sensibility.

Uribe made sustainability part of his agenda early on and is now focused on honing signature DIY archetypes. An update on the terrific denim he showed for Spring 2019, the new jeans had an appealing tropical look thanks to the appliqué hibiscus flowers. The safety pin-studded Bermuda shorts were a showstopper when they were first worn by rapper Rico Nasty last season and are likely to be a hit in this new one. In a moment when the notion of luxury is being reevaluated altogether, Uribe’s soulful one-of-a-kind pieces are a sunny proposition.

Source: VogueRunway

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3.1 Phillip Lim NYFW SPRING 2020 READY-TO-WEAR

It has been years since Phillip Lim staged a coed show, and he marked the occasion by choosing a new venue for Spring 2020: an open-air warehouse in Greenpoint. Despite the agonizing traffic to and from the Brooklyn neighborhood—this reviewer barely made it in time from the Lower East Side—the vibe mirrored that of his Spring collection: urban yet somehow tranquil. Backstage, Lim was talking about his brand’s values—community, diversity, optimism—and his efforts to pare things back and create items with a clear purpose.

His experiments with tailoring were Spring’s highlights. You won’t find a conventional two-piece suit here; there are enough of those to go around, for starters, and Lim saw an opportunity to create something different for his clients. His most intriguing proposition was a sleeveless, elongated vest with a detachable piece draped around the shoulders, sort of like a scarf; styled with matching trousers or a flow-y midi skirt, the combination was boundary pushing without being too outré for a typical New York office. (Lim knows precisely who his customers are: working women across a variety of fields.) The same was true of an asymmetrical blazer with sleek cutouts and a detachable hood, as well as a jacket shown with a leather bandana—a clever accessory wearers will be happy to play around with.

Earlier this summer, Lim debuted a Resort collection that was 40 percent sustainable thanks to new organic and recycled fabrics. He continued those efforts here, pointing out the compact organic cotton of a chocolate brown jumpsuit and the coated cupro of a navy midi dress. It had a liquid-y gleam from afar, like heavyweight satin, and in photos it reads almost as leather, but cupro is made from upcycled cotton waste. Materials aside, designing with intention is a smaller yet crucial part of the sustainability conversation. By nixing the unnecessary bells and whistles, Lim hopes to create pieces with serious longevity. Any designer can source better fabrics, but few can resist the urge to complicate their clothes. Going forward, it would be great to see Lim become a louder voice in the sustainability conversation; as he enters his 15th year in business, it will be an important part of maintaining his momentum and staying competitive with the very woke new guard.

3.1 Phillip Lim NYFW SPRING 2020 READY-TO-WEAR

Source: VogueRunway

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Helmut Lang NYFW SPRING 2020 READY-TO-WEAR

Helmut Lang NYFW SPRING 2020 READY-TO-WEAR

Not far from where Mark Thomas and Thomas Cawson staged their second runway show for Helmut Lang the brand today, an exhibition of Helmut Lang the man’s latest artwork was opening. Lang walked away from his company 15 years ago, and in the interim, it’s gone through its fair share of incarnations. Perhaps because of the significant amount of time that’s passed or maybe because of the recent success of the reissue concept, Thomas and Cawson are taking a very faithful approach to their reimagining of this famous label.

The reissue is a divisive concept. On the one hand, it’s a clever way to address youthful FOMO, on the other, it’s a design cop-out that doesn’t push the conversation forward. The pros see smart money and the cons insist fashion must reflect the present situation or it risks becoming costume. As with so many things, there’s a generational divide. The olds raise an eyebrow, but the youngs turn up in droves. Today, Jeremy O. Harris, Maisie Williams and her new boyfriend Reuben Selby, Charlie Plummer, Lucky Blue Smith, Selah Marley, and Paloma Elsesser all sat in the front row.

Millennials, it would seem, are the target customers. But in fact, what Thomas and Cawson are up to looks good enough that the Helmut faithful might be intrigued. Absent a few dresses that read too sweet, this was an accurate accounting of Lang’s signatures: the minimal tailoring, the utilitarian parkas, the sheer elements, the chromed leather, the touch of latex kink, the denim shapes. Reproducing the electricity of anticipation that used to course through Lang’s show spaces is a much harder trick to pull off. And it’s probably not fair to ask it of Thomas and Cawson. Lang was an original.

Source: VogueRunway

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Tomo Koizumi NYFW SPRING 2020 READY-TO-WEAR

“I want to make something that is not commercial,” said Tomo Koizumi before his Spring 2020 show. The designer, who caught the eye of Katie Grand on Instagram six months ago and subsequently flew to New York one week later for his debut, felt no inhibitions about so boldly bucking the trends of the American fashion landscape. He has set up shop in Marc Jacobs’s atelier and uses Jacobs’s Madison Avenue store for his shows, and in this, he has become a spiritual successor to Jacobs’s fashion for fashion’s sake mantra of late. Koizumi’s clothes are more costume than ready-to-wear, intended to provoke and inspire. To make the point, he cast model Ariel Nicholson in a one-woman show in which she dressed and undressed in seven garments, twirling and gasping to the ambient tunes that echoed throughout the store.

As a display of fashion, it was breathtaking. Nicholson, the 18-year-old trans model and Raf Simons muse, projected well beyond a full painted face of glitter and a conehead ’do. As attendants dressed and undressed her in Koizumi’s ombré ensembles, she oohed and aahed, trying to keep the audience enthralled. No disrespect to her performance, but the structure and fabrications of the garments were enough.

All seven are made of hundreds of meters of ruffled Japanese polyester organza and utilize only one zipper. The construction is fascinating, with the ruffles backed by a cloth lining, suspended above each other like cascades of cake frosting. The silhouettes were pushed far beyond those of Koizumi’s debut, with jumpsuits, bodysuits, and ballooning sleeves layered under scarves of ruffles and bows. The designer said he chose the bow motif because he wanted the collection to represent his gift back to the people who made him. “I just want to bring joy,” he said simply. Mission achieved.

Source: VogueRunway

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Elie Tahari NYFW SPRING 2020 READY-TO-WEAR

Inspired by the vibes of 1970s Soho, Elie Tahari’s collection at NYFW September 2019 emits an electric energy that melds the industrial and creative worlds into one. As an ode to The City That Never Sleeps, textures and patterns evoke a vibe that contrasts urban with artistic, lighting the stage with a vibrancy that can only be described as “New York.”

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UNIQLO UT Enlists Artist Yoon Hyup for Mickey Mouse Apparel Collaboration

Following its ‘Sailor Moon Eternal’ t-shirt collection, UNIQLO UT now enlists New York-based artist Yoon Hyup to design an apparel capsule inspired by Disney’s Mickey and Minnie Mouse characters. Hyup’s signature line and dot artworks adorn the graphics-packed assemblage spanning hoodies, sweatshirts and tees in men’s, women’s, and kids sizes. Highlights include a black crewneck sweatshirt with white graphics of several Disney characters across the chest portion as well as a heather grey tee with an abstract interpretation of Mickey.

View the collaboration above and expect the capsule to launch at UNIQLO stores stateside on August 26.

Source: HypeBeast

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