Fear of God's ESSENTIALS FW19 Collection

Fear of God’s ESSENTIALS range has delivered its latest release of casual staples for Fall/Winter 2019, this time around serving up a photographic collection featuring artwork by Shaniqwa Jarvis. The assortment includes hoodies and crewnecks, offered in black and white, that have all been printed with floral imagery created by the photographer.

Each hoodie features a kangaroo pocket and an ESSENTIALS branding emblem on the front. The white edition is marked by pink flowers and a blue sky across the back for a softer palette, while the black version gets brightened up with orange and green blossoms. A rubberized logo patch on the hood finishes them off. Meanwhile, Jarvis’ artwork follows the same scheme for the crewneck silhouettes, which feature ribbed knitting at the collar, cuffs and hem for a classic construction.

The hoodies are priced at $100 USD, while the crewnecks are priced at $90 USD. All styles are available to shop now from SSENSE’s webstore.

Source:HypeBeast

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Burberry Releases SS19 Runway Zip-Up Shirt

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Burberry has released one of its most iconic Spring/Summer 2019 runway pieces, the “WHY DID THEY KILL BAMBI?” deer-print shirt.

The Riccardo Tisci-designed piece is steeped in history and references. The printed phrase takes after more than just one pool of inspiration, as it looks to the lyrics of the Sex Pistols’ 1979 song “Who Killed Bambi?” — which was incidentally co-written by Vivienne Westwood, who soon went on to collaborate with Tisci at Burberry — as well as Tisci’s time as the head of Givenchy, which delivered a number of iconic Bambi-adorned pieces. The print also nods to the fact that Burberry said it would no longer use fur in its future collections.

Burberry’s short-sleeve offering is made from cotton twill and features a half-zip down the front using leather hardware. The boxy fit is complemented by two box-shaped chest pockets, and on the rear, Burberry has added two pictures of a porcelain deer.

Take a closer look at this SS19 runway piece from Burberry in the gallery above, and pick it up for yourself from retailers such as MATCHESFASHION.COM for $903 USD.

Source: HypeBeast

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Saks Fifth Avenue Just Got into the Insanely-Hyped Shoe Game

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Saks Fifth Avenue’s flagship store in New York (as in, the one on Fifth Avenue), as part of its “Grand Renovation,” just cut the ribbon on a new 8,000 square foot space dedicated exclusively to things for your feet. Specifically, all the very, very stylish, rare, and expensive men’s shoes you have ever pined after, stood in line for, or whimsically added to your virtual cart without any intention of purchasing. We’re talking the dirty Guccis, the glitter Zanottis, those sold out FOG jams.

There are over 2,000 SKUs, 160 exclusives, shoe repair stations, a “lace personalization” bar, multilingual advisors—literally everything you could ever want in a brick-and-mortar shoe shopping ,experience short of alcoholic beverages (although, who knows, that might be there too) all under one roof, all on one floor. If a trip to New York isn't in the cards for you, there’s a silver lining: the internet. Because along with its major retail upgrade, the men’s shoe selection on Saks.com also recently got stacked with new styles and will continue to enjoy footwear greatness as a result of this flagship upgrade.

Source: GC

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Alyx Spring 2020 Men's and Women's Collection

Matthew Williams of 1017 Alyx 9SM (his brand’s full name) didn’t seem to attach much meaning to his venue—a stunning, modernized bank building—yet two words projected loud and clear: big and business. This is what Alyx is fast becoming and what the combined men’s and women’s collections encapsulated with their assertive silhouettes and high-fashion positioning.

As the penultimate show of a strong week, Alyx was something to behold, arousing the glory days of Thierry Mugler in the 1980s while attracting the next-generation crowd that has brought incontrovertible energy back to Paris. For now, at least, Williams is committing to a more formal form of urban than his peers. For him, tailoring is not just an outward statement, but an inward reflection of mastery. “Tailoring is a really difficult thing to do as a young brand,” he said. “Some of the construction we’re attempting to do is trying to find our own language. I think it’s a nice challenge to define what that is for us.”

Arguably, his challenge is how to achieve that difference without appearing over-designed. From past visits with him, before he switched to a show format, he revealed his process as methodical, almost obsessional for the way he will privilege one detail over another. Chances are, he vetoed at least a dozen chains before landing on the one that repeats as a parabolic flourish on several of these looks. Other details—elongating panels, zippered knees, hammered hardware, sculpted heels—were fine-tuned in order to be fully integrated, not gratuitous. Elsewhere, outdoorsy pieces that harked back to earlier collections blended in while the draped dresses towards the end remained slightly unresolved.

But that’s just surface stuff; anyone who read the accompanying notes would have learned about the metal hardware sourced from a sustainable factory, the near-waterless leather-dyeing process, the three-dimensional printed seams and myriad more examples of innovation adding functional and psychological value to the clothes. Or, as stated in this succinct yet thorough document, “We engage with systems, scales, and soul.”

Williams, for his part, also suggested the designs gain dimension from those wearing them. “Our casting is a real mixture of models and friends and family—those people’s energy really brings out the clothes.” See Model 54, aka his wife Jennifer, who wore a croc-embossed jacket (the treatment of the season) and a corresponding translucent skirt. Enough of the guests knew her that cheers echoed through the space as though she were an international celebrity. It was a telling moment. Alyx, now acting all grown up, remains as independent and in-the-know as always.

Source: VOGUE RUNWAY

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MARIA ARISTIDOU FW19-20 COUTURE

CLAIR DE LUNE COUTURE

COLLECTION FALL WINTER 2019 2020 HAUTE COUTURE PARIS FASHION WEEK

Looking up into the night sky you feel motionless and mesmerized as you fall prey to the moon’s charm.
Whether it is crescent or full, you bear witness to an eternal celestial struggle for dominance between light and darkness.

The moon’s power and its magnetism are transcended to us through its light. It is this very moonlight that, like an invisible veil, dresses up the night and sets the mood. Whether it falls upon an ocean, a desert or upon a woman’s body it inspires romanticism, a feeling of mystery, elegance and seduction, a fascination with the female form.

Maria Aristidou’s knit couture collection Autumn Winter 2019/20 is an ode to Clair de Lune.
The cuts, the designs and accessories with hand embroidered embellishments on colorful, luxurious knit fabrics, made by the designer; they all accentuate the timeless romance, femininity and uniqueness that are defined in every flicker, every speck of Clair de Lune.

The magic of knitwear inspired the designer to first explore and then create, using luxurious threads, elaborate techniques and various knit patterns. The craftsmanship of detailed hand embroideries adds to the uniqueness of Maria Aristidou's fabric collections for the couture evening and accessories. The process of each collection production starts from the fabric design. Yarns such as wool, viscose, lurex, cotton, silk and velvet are ordered from France and Italy. Then, a series of patterns are designed in great detail followed by a series of tests to decide on the yarns that will be used for each pattern, how thick or thin the fabric, color sampling combinations, hand-embroidery design testing, quality and durability checks, etc. The whole design and production processes take place in Cyprus.

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Off-White Spring 2020 Menswear

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The opening look and most of the closing, women’s included, at this Off-White show were made in collaboration with the New York artist Futura—aka Lenny McGurr. His vivid spray strokes and sleekly alien Pointman figure were incorporated as print or jacquard into suiting, soft trenches, cycling vests, denim, a blanket, and evening dresses. As Virgil Abloh sketched it in his long sentences backstage: “In his lifetime, and in the culture that we come from, which is a segment of hip-hop and graffiti, [his work] started out being seen as a form of vandalism, not art. . . . But as well as painting on the side of subway trains, he was part of the scene and showed with Basquiat and Keith Haring. . . . . He was on what was once thought of as the fringe. . . . but now, through time, we can see that the beauty of Basquiat is also the beauty of Lenny, Futura.”

That transition from the counterculture—the fringe—to become both the subject of establishment acclaim and an agent of change within the establishment mirrors Abloh’s own path: In the 10 years since he was photographed by Tommy Ton with Kanye West and crew outside Comme des Garçons, Abloh has completed the full loop. But reflecting on the longer span of Futura’s journey—combined with his own recent project curating his past body of work for the “Figures of Speech” exhibition in Chicago—has made Abloh consider a bigger picture. “When I make things, I look at it on a scale of 30 years. What gives the esteem and the energy . . . I know the work has to mean something now, but I’m also thinking about what it means when you zoom out.”

There was certainly a sense of space in time in some of this collection. Its span of reference was broad but as legibly interconnected as the branding on the new Nike Dunk, codesigned with Futura, that made its debut on Abloh’s carnation-field runway. The chain-link fence pattern on bags, jackets, and a semitransparent poncho played nicely against the densely hand-knit sweaters that bore patches declaring membership in the “Off-White climbing club.”

Climbing was not only this collection’s second big theme—reflected in the drawstrings worked into suiting, the technical luggage, and the nylon patched knit faux fleeces—but it was also part of the broader metaphor at play. A sky blue suede trench with detachable front pockets, a double-layered floral-print down jacket and shorts, a chain-link knit off-white shirt and shorts, plus the recut denim template workwear in washed and treated technical fabrics were all highly polished and finished pieces. Conversely, the tie-dyed cargo pants (sometimes crystal set) and denim, the bandana-patched T-shirts, those dense knit sweaters, and bleached flannel shirting were all designed to appear roughened and weathered.

In a piece of tape played before the show, Bjork spoke about the “spaced-outness” of perspective, nurtured through the landscape of Iceland, that helped her learn songwriting. Abloh seems to be in search of a similar panoramic point of view—an apex position—and the topography of the clothes he is producing as he makes that ascent is benefiting from it.

Source: VOGUE

FASHIONADO

Tom Ford Opening at Phipps Plaza

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Simon, a global leader in premier shopping, dining, entertainment and mixed-use destinations today announced that iconic luxury brand Tom Ford will open boutiques at two of Simon’s premier properties, The Galleria in Houston and Phipps Plaza in Atlanta. Both boutiques will feature women’s and men’s ready-to-wear fashion and will open by Holiday 2019.

The 4,000 square-foot store in Houston will be located in The Galleria’s luxury wing which includes Chanel, Valentino, Louis Vuitton, and Saint Laurent among others. At 4,500 square feet, the Tom Ford boutique at Phipps Plaza will join the new Valentino boutique, newly-expanded Gucci and Jeffrey stores, and the first-in-market Saint Laurent.

“We’re very pleased to continue our long-standing relationship with Simon through the addition of our two newest stores in Phipps Plaza and The Galleria,” said Tom Ford, the company’s Chief Executive Officer and Creative Director. “Houston and Atlanta continue to be very strong markets for our business, and we look forward to serving our customers in these new stores.”

“Simon and Tom Ford are a perfect fit combining one of fashion’s most prestigious names with two of Simon’s leading properties,” said Velda Turan, Simon’s Senior Vice President of Luxury Leasing.

More than 30 million visitors each year enjoy the uniquely comprehensive experience of The Galleria, one of the nation’s top ten shopping centers and the largest in Texas. Spanning 2.4 million square feet of space, housing 400 stores and restaurants, two high-rise hotels, and three office towers, The Galleria is Houston’s most popular retail and tourist destination, meeting every budget, style and taste. The Houston Galleria is owned by a joint venture between Simon and Institutional Mall Investors.

Located in Atlanta’s prestigious Buckhead district, Simon’s Phipps Plaza is the Southeast’s premier upscale shopping, dining and entertainment destination. Its distinctive mix of contemporary and luxury fashion is home to more than 50 market-exclusive brands. Ground was broken in October 2018 on a transformative mixed-use redevelopment which will include the arrival of Nobu Hotel and Restaurant Atlanta, a 90,000 square-foot Life Time® healthy living and entertainment destination, and One Phipps Plaza, a 13-story, 350,000 square foot Class A office building. The reimagined Phipps Plaza is set to open in phases beginning in 2020.

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