Pharrell & Chanel Officially Debut Collaboration in 'Akira'-Inspired Campaign

CHANEL-Pharrell-capsule-collection-film

After teasing the collection in recent appearances — including a new Harper’s Bazaar Korea spread — Pharrell has now officially debuted his full Chanel collaboration. Aptly titled “Chanel Pharrell,” the collection features heavy co-branded detailing including embroidery and sequinned logos.

Stand-out pieces in the collection include the previously-teased yellow bathrobe, brightly-colored hoodies and T-shirts. Other key pieces include the range of accessories, which spans oversized shopper bags, “Chanel Pharrell” diamond jewelry and bucket hats. In terms of footwear, the collection covers sneakers with hand-drawn text and doodles, as well as co-branded loafers and sliders.

The collection also references a personal anecdote from Pharrell. The creative once bet with a friend that he would not work with Chanel. Having lost this bet, Pharrell has printed his response to his friend on a T-shirt.

To coincide with the launch of the collection, Pharrell has released a behind-the-scenes video of the collection. In the video, Pharrell discusses the idea of gender-fluidity, meeting Karl Lagerfeld and the importance of the number 5 as an influence on the collection. Other participants in the video discuss the influence of Akira and motorcycle gangs on the campaign, as well as how the collection fuses streetwear with Chanel’s “devotion to haute couture and artisanship.”

The full “Chanel Pharrell” collection is set to release in Seoul on March 29, before getting a global release on April 4.

Source:HypeBeast

FASHIONADO

CHANEL Fall 2019 Ready-To-Wear

_ALE0072.jpg

In a show that was somber yet serene, a capturing of airiness and substance, of shrugged-on elegance and insuppressible delight, the farewell to the immense talent of Karl Lagerfeld was framed just as he’d imagined. He took us to a place high in the mountains on a beautiful day. It was a snow-bound haven—a slice of Chanel heaven, viewed from a distance that was poignantly difficult to bear.

There was an icicle-like tinkling on the soundtrack. Models assembled, one by one, on the snow-covered steps of a faux alpine hostelry, the Chanel Gardenia. It was hard, the suppressed anticipation of what was going to happen next. What is the correct form for honoring someone at a fashion show, someone who was always so fixed on waving away vulgar sentimentality, and who always had something hilariously skewering to say about the posthumous hagiographies of anyone he cared to mention? Karl Lagerfeld was the least sentimental of people. He loved his job and always regarded it as the task of continually living in the present. He reveled in letting it be known he had a “contract for life” with Chanel, which he enjoyed to the maximum moment.

Well, this is how it went. There was a minute’s silence. And then, Karl Lagerfeld’s voiceover, from a recent Chanel podcast (this man loved every tech advancement). He spoke in French, until the last sentence, where he burst through in English about his pleasure in imagining the detonation of a surprise on an audience in, “Oh! It’s like walking in a painting!”

The Chanel girls—his crew, the latest generation he’d encouraged and quipped with in the Chanel studio since 1983—were clearly conscious of the ceremonial responsibilities they had. They trod the “snow,” hands in pockets, insouciantly proving what a perfectly considered collection of wide-legged trouser suits these were—with long, swirlingly soft, checked tweed coats he’d envisaged in tandem with his longtime right-hand Virginie Viard.

That section was amazingly poised. Tailoring is a subject du jour, but through the filter of Chanel consciousness, we saw tradition, femininity, and an energetic projection of the shape of today. Let’s put it down here: The opening, some of the wide, pleated trousers, was incredibly on point—a flipping of the Chanel tradition of opening with tweed skirtsuits—with playful snowballs of tulle and crystallized snowflakes thrown into the back of the girls’ hair.

What Karl Lagerfeld never forgot—he was a rare intellectual pragmatist who frequently ridiculed high-concept fashion—is that clothes are nothing unless they are worn. That was Coco Chanel all over, too. It should be remembered that, by the late 1970s, few cared about her legacy. Her canon had been put in the shade by Yves Saint Laurent until Karl Lagerfeld was hired into the house by the Wertheimer family in 1983. It was Lagerfeld who irreverently illuminated the codes of Chanel—irradiating them in the constantly changing sidelights of the events of four decades’ worth of current affairs, the serial revolutions of fax, the Internet, social, and the global reach of fashion to new generations in Asia, and beyond.

He was always up for a topical gimmick and a punning accessory, but he also knew about emotional intelligence—that, and his connection with nature and nuances connecting the dots of his past, came through in his last few collections. The last big break he’d given his audience—the sight of barefoot girls running on a Caribbean beach—was superseded by this immersion in alpine sunlight.

So this collection was Lagerfeld at his uplifting best. No matter how dark the days were, his ability to throw on the icing of a ruffly white organza blouse, to sparkle up embroideries with a deft hand on a Nordic sweater, or to conjure dream dresses within any theme to which his huge imagination traveled. These were the gifts he gave to fashion. Today, as always.

As the models dashed away tears, and the audience stood in gratitude to applaud, the unforgettable memory of Karl Lagerfeld’s elegant, frivolous mind was lifted onto the Olympus of the fashion greats.

CHANEL Fall 2019 Ready-To-Wear

Source: VogueRunway

FASHIONADO

Pharrell Williams Is Chanel's First Handbag Model: Find Out What He Keeps Inside

Your favorite brands, including Chanel and Alexandre Vauthier have just released new ads starring celebs. 

Pharrell Williams has made Chanel history by being the first man to front a handbag campaign for the brand. In the latest ad, Pharrell models the "Gabrielle" bag in a new crocodile version for the campaign which also stars Cara Delevigne, Kristen Stewart and Caroline de Maigret showcasing different versions of the "Gabrielle" handbag. Not only did Pharrell model the handbag in the ads but he is carrying it around in real life. He states that when he first started carrying it that he didn't have anything in it, but now he uses it to carry his phone and essential personal things.

Check out the latest ads with Pharrell Williams, Lily-Rose Depp, Gigi Hadid and so many more here on www.people.com.

fashionado

CHANEL Spring 2015

Uncle Karl took to the streets to protest women's lib for Spring 2015. It was a very stylish spectacle. (Last season Chanel went grocery shopping, remember that?!) I am all for showmanship, I love it, but what about the clothes? I was underwhelmed by the first grouping of tweeds. Dare I say they felt (a little) frumpy? But hey, if you're going to be frumpy, why not in Chanel! The black and white pieces towards the end of the collection were my favorites. And there were some pretty fab caplets and coats of varying lengths.

View Collection:

chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado
chanel-fashionado

fashionado

Karl Lagerfeld's Fendi Mini-Me

cara_karl.jpg
rs_600x600-140220085548-600.2cara-delevingne-model.ls.22014_copy.jpg

[from Cara's Instagram] Backstage at Fendi with Karl Lagerfeld & mini-Karl

In the two+ decades that I have been following Karl Lagerfeld's prolific career, I never thought I'd be using the word cute in the same sentence as the creative genius, even less, to describe him! Last week everything changed when model Cara Develvingne marched onto the Fendi runway in Milan wearing a fierce fur hood and holding a super-fabulous furry Karl.

Huh? What?!

Yup, look at the pics. We're not entirely sure what to do with the mini-me Karl accessory but hey, high fashion isn't always practical. I want one!

fashionado

CHANEL COUTURE SPRING 2014

CHA_0801.450x675.JPG

It's been often said that Karl Lagerfeld is a genius; I won't argue that.

He is.

But where I find his genius to lie within is not in Lagerfeld's indisputable talent but in his ability to keep such an established house young and modern. While the collection was textile and texture rich, the overall emotion was light and sporty. The models wore sneakers!

How fabulous is that?!

[Watch the video] the show doesn't disappoint in visual drama. That stage was immaculate and glorious plus who can resist a grand staircase? What I found most ironic and perhaps controversial about the collection was Lagerfeld's use of the corset -- and item despised by Queen Coco! I'm sure it was no accident.

fashionado

Victoria Beckham Covers Elle France November 2012

victoria-beckham-karl-lagerfeld-elle-france-cover-fashionado

Spicing up the month of November for

Elle

France in a photo shoot by

Karl Lagerfeld

is

Victoria Beckham

. It's a good thing the article is in French so that we don't have to suffer through idiotic comments such as: 

"I like to look like a Parisian. I sometimes feel a little French,"

says the former Spice Girl. The photographs, on the other hand, are fabulous! Taken in

Coco Chanel's

iconic apartment, the only language the black and white images speak are chic, elegant and edgy.

View photos:

victoria-beckham-elle-france-cover-fashionado
victoria-beckham-elle-france-cover-fashionado
victoria-beckham-elle-france-cover-fashionado
victoria-beckham-elle-france-cover-fashionado
victoria-beckham-elle-france-cover-fashionado

join

fashionado

on

facebook

&

twitter