Tom Ford NYFW SPRING 2020 READY-TO-WEAR

How many times have you heard that the streets of New York are a runway? Well, the same is true of the subway, only maybe more so. There’s glamour and grit down there, same as above ground, but down below there’s a captive audience.

Tom Ford is the new chairman of the CFDA, and after starting in June his first move was to shorten New York Fashion Week. Simultaneous with the consolidation, designers have been producing more experiential events. We’ve seen bands, modern dancers, and a 75-person choir this week, but only Ford arranged for a private viewing of a disused platform of the Bowery stop on the J/Z line lit an electric pink for the occasion. Many of his 180 guests were surely subway first-timers, but the regular commuters got a big kick out of it too.

What is Mr. Slick doing in the subway? Ford’s notes made mention of the famous shot of Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick emerging out of a manhole cover. The subway also jibes with his new-since-last-season interest in simplicity. “I think that it’s a time for ease,” he wrote, “and in that way a return to the kind of luxurious sportswear that America has become known for all over the world.”

Enter look one: a jersey scoop-neck tee with the short sleeves rolled up to the shoulders and a duchesse satin skirt so white it was beaming. Not exactly subway-safe, it was low-key fabulous and synthesized the compelling high-low essence of the collection. Or consider another example: satin blazers cut characteristically strong and worn with elastic-waist nylon basketball shorts. “These torture me,” Ford wrote of the shorts, pointing out that he doesn’t let his son Jack wear them, even though his classmates do. “I’m always fascinated by things that ‘torture me.’” Ford didn’t play it completely contrary, though. The molded plastic tops were a luscious homage to Yves Saint Laurent’s Lalanne breastplates via Issey Miyake. And Ford’s tailored men’s jackets were typically loud and louche.

Connecting with one of the key messages of the season so far—let’s call it the nearly naked trend, for now—Ford threw a dress coat over a leather bra, cut a jumpsuit so it fell open to expose a strappy bikini top, and sent out a pair of slinky maillots. Of course, the millennial designers doing the same have probably been studying Ford’s old Gucci shows. That legacy of great American sportswear Ford was talking about? He has a stake in it. What’s new is old, that’s just how fashion works. Credit Ford, he’s expanding his vocabulary.

Source: VogueRunway

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Gypsy Sport NYFW SPRING 2020 READY-TO-WEAR

Gypsy-Sport nyfw 2020

Life is not always a beach for young designers trying to make it in fashion, and Rio Uribe of Gypsy Sport would know. Over the past six years he’s successfully navigated the changing tides of the industry, running a fully independent business with unwavering commitment. Still, when it’s all work and no play, there’s not much room left for creative daydreaming. Which is why, these days, Uribe is making a conscious effort to make more time for himself. With palms tree lining the runway, that joyous out-of-office attitude was in the air at his show today. Showgoers at the rooftop venue were clearly feeling the vibe, too, and sipped on fruit cocktails in the warm Indian summer evening.

The sunset tangerine and canary yellow palette of the clothes spoke directly to a permanent vacation mood. Shimmying out while covered in sparkling gold body paint, the first model set the tone, flaunting a party-starting halter-neck dress fashioned from hundreds of beaded safety pins. That ingenious approach to chainmail is one Uribe has been evolving for the past few seasons and is proving surprisingly popular despite—or perhaps because of—its unabashed fashion-forward sensibility.

Uribe made sustainability part of his agenda early on and is now focused on honing signature DIY archetypes. An update on the terrific denim he showed for Spring 2019, the new jeans had an appealing tropical look thanks to the appliqué hibiscus flowers. The safety pin-studded Bermuda shorts were a showstopper when they were first worn by rapper Rico Nasty last season and are likely to be a hit in this new one. In a moment when the notion of luxury is being reevaluated altogether, Uribe’s soulful one-of-a-kind pieces are a sunny proposition.

Source: VogueRunway

FASHIONADO

Ka Wa Key Spring/Summer 2020 Collection

ka-wa-key nyfwm fashionado

KA WA KEY presented SS20 collection titled "What happens in grandpa's closet stays in grandpa's closet" at the NYMD during NYFW: Men's. The collection is inspired and is interpretation of old sailor wear and clothes our grand parents would have worn when they were young.

The collection is a story of "my" grandpa who sailed the seas and experienced the world with all of his senses. This is his secrets and his future, past and present.  This is grandpa's closet.

For this romantic and artisanal collection, KA WA KEY used their signature treatments: devore for distressed sheer effect, original dreamy watercolor handprinted prints and knitted fabrics. Collection is defined by sheer, floaty and layered constructions and pastel colors.

"Wind blowing in my face, sun rays warming up my body. I hear the call of youth. I can taste it.  I am floating, the waves take me away, back to my memories."

Ka Wa Key Spring/Summer 2020 Collection nyfwm

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Theory Fall 2017 Ready-to-Wear

Theory Fall 2017 Ready-to-Wear

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Marc Jacobs Fall 2017 Ready-to-Wear

Marc Jacobs Fall 2017 Ready-to-Wear

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Pyer Moss Fall 2017 Ready-to-Wear

Pyer Moss Fall 2017 Ready-to-Wear

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